The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1

R. E. Stanley, K. L. Berg, D. B. Einstein, P. S W Lee, Y. G. Yeung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is a growth factor for mononuclear phagocytic cells. Through alternative mRNA splicing and differential post-translational proteolytic processing, CSF-1 can either be secreted into the circulation as a glycoprotein or chondroitin sulfate-containing proteoglycan or expressed as a membrane-spanning glycoprotein on the surface of synthesizing cells. The discovery that the osteopetrotic (op/op) mutant mouse possesses an inactivating mutation in the CSF-1 gene has greatly contributed to our understanding of CSF-1 biology. CSF-1 directly regulates some non-mononuclear phagocytic cells that express the CSF-1 receptor tyrosine kinase, but is not required for their development. However, it directly regulates the development and maintenance of tissue macrophage subpopulations that appear to have important trophic and/or scavenger roles in tissue morphogenesis and function. Depending on the tissue, this regulation may be local (via the cell-surface form) localized (via the sequestered proteoglycan form) or humoral. It appears that the CSF-1 dependent tissue macrophage subpopulations, via their effects on other cell types, can significantly affect functions in tissues as diverse as testis, brain and skin, and their absence in op/op mice may explain the pleiotropy of the op/op phenotype. To investigate post-CSF-1 receptor signaling in the macrophage, procedures have been developed for the purification and sequence determination of the proteins that are rapidly phosphorylated on tyrosine in response to CSF-1. Several have been identified and the behavior of one of them, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C (PTP1C), is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalStem Cells
Volume12
Issue numberSUPPL.
StatePublished - 1994

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Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor
Colony-Stimulating Factor Receptors
Macrophages
Phagocytes
Non-Receptor Type 6 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase
Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans
Membrane Glycoproteins
Protein Sequence Analysis
Alternative Splicing
Proteoglycans
Morphogenesis
Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Tyrosine
Testis
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Glycoproteins
Maintenance
Phenotype
Messenger RNA
Skin

Keywords

  • colony stimulating factor-1
  • CSF-1
  • growth factor
  • macrophages
  • op mutation
  • organogenesis
  • osteopetrotic mouse
  • phosphotyrosine
  • protein tyrosine phosphatase 1C
  • tissue remodeling
  • tyrosine kinases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Stanley, R. E., Berg, K. L., Einstein, D. B., Lee, P. S. W., & Yeung, Y. G. (1994). The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1. Stem Cells, 12(SUPPL.), 15-24.

The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1. / Stanley, R. E.; Berg, K. L.; Einstein, D. B.; Lee, P. S W; Yeung, Y. G.

In: Stem Cells, Vol. 12, No. SUPPL., 1994, p. 15-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stanley, RE, Berg, KL, Einstein, DB, Lee, PSW & Yeung, YG 1994, 'The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1', Stem Cells, vol. 12, no. SUPPL., pp. 15-24.
Stanley RE, Berg KL, Einstein DB, Lee PSW, Yeung YG. The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1. Stem Cells. 1994;12(SUPPL.):15-24.
Stanley, R. E. ; Berg, K. L. ; Einstein, D. B. ; Lee, P. S W ; Yeung, Y. G. / The biology and action of colony stimulating factor-1. In: Stem Cells. 1994 ; Vol. 12, No. SUPPL. pp. 15-24.
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