The Association of Changes in Pain Acceptance and Headache-Related Disability

Jason Lillis, J. Graham Thomas, Richard B. Lipton, Lucille Rathier, Julie Roth, Jelena M. Pavlovic, Kevin C. O'Leary, Dale S. Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Migraine accounts for substantial suffering and disability. Previous studies show cross-sectional associations between higher pain acceptance and lower headache-related disability in individuals with migraine, but none has evaluated this association longitudinally during migraine treatment. PURPOSE: This study evaluated whether changes in pain acceptance were associated with changes in headache-related disability and migraine characteristics in a randomized controlled trial (Women's Health and Migraine) that compared effects of behavioral weight loss (BWL) treatment and migraine education (ME) on headache frequency in women with migraine and overweight/obesity. METHODS: This was a post hoc analysis of 110 adult women with comorbid migraine and overweight/obesity who received 16 weeks of either BWL or ME. Linear and nonlinear mixed effects modeling methods were used to test for between-group differences in change in pain acceptance, and also to examine the association between change in pain acceptance and change in headache disability. RESULTS: BWL and ME did not differ on improvement in pain acceptance from baseline across post-treatment and follow-up. Improvement in pain acceptance was associated with reduced headache disability, even when controlling for intervention-related improvements in migraine frequency, headache duration, and pain intensity. CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first to show that improvements in pain acceptance following two different treatments are associated with greater reductions in headache-related disability, suggesting a potential new target for intervention development. CLINICAL TRIALS INFORMATION: NCT01197196.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)686-690
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Volume53
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 4 2019

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Migraine Disorders
Headache
Pain
Weight Loss
Education
Obesity
Women's Health
Therapeutics
Psychological Stress
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cross-Sectional Studies
Clinical Trials

Keywords

  • Acceptance
  • Disability
  • Headache
  • Migraine
  • Obesity
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

The Association of Changes in Pain Acceptance and Headache-Related Disability. / Lillis, Jason; Thomas, J. Graham; Lipton, Richard B.; Rathier, Lucille; Roth, Julie; Pavlovic, Jelena M.; O'Leary, Kevin C.; Bond, Dale S.

In: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 7, 04.06.2019, p. 686-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lillis, Jason ; Thomas, J. Graham ; Lipton, Richard B. ; Rathier, Lucille ; Roth, Julie ; Pavlovic, Jelena M. ; O'Leary, Kevin C. ; Bond, Dale S. / The Association of Changes in Pain Acceptance and Headache-Related Disability. In: Annals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 53, No. 7. pp. 686-690.
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