The association between maternal body mass index and severity of neonatal illness in very low birth weight infants

Christie J. Bruno, Robert Locke, Amy MacKley, David A. Paul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective.To determine the effect of maternal body mass index BMI and pregnancy weight gain on neonatal illness severity in very low birth weight infants. Methods.Cohort study of infants with birth weight less than 1500 g at a level 3 Neonatal Intensive Care Unit from July 2003 to July 2005, n=301. The main outcome included neonatal illness severity, as measured by the Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology (SNAP). SNAP was investigated in relationship to maternal BMI and pregnancy weight gain. Statistical analysis included Pearson correlation, ANOVA and multivariable linear regression. Results.At delivery and pre-pregnancy, 49 and 54% of mothers were overweight, respectively. Black mothers were more likely to be overweight with less pregnancy weight gain compared with white mothers. After controlling for confounding variables, maternal pre-pregnancy BMI, pregnancy BMI and weight gain were not associated with neonatal illness. Conclusions.In our population of very low birth weight infants, maternal BMI was not associated with neonatal illness severity. Black mothers had higher pre-pregnancy BMI and less weight gain than white mothers. The significance of these differences needs further exploration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)560-564
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume22
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Body Mass Index
Mothers
Weight Gain
Pregnancy
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Birth Weight
Linear Models
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies

Keywords

  • BMI
  • Maternal obesity
  • Neonatal illness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

The association between maternal body mass index and severity of neonatal illness in very low birth weight infants. / Bruno, Christie J.; Locke, Robert; MacKley, Amy; Paul, David A.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 22, No. 7, 2009, p. 560-564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bruno, Christie J. ; Locke, Robert ; MacKley, Amy ; Paul, David A. / The association between maternal body mass index and severity of neonatal illness in very low birth weight infants. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2009 ; Vol. 22, No. 7. pp. 560-564.
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