The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people

Aleyda Perez-Herrera, Oriol A. Rangel-Zuñiga, Javier Delgado-Lista, Carmen Marin, Pablo Perez-Martinez, Inmaculada Tasset, Isaac Tunez, Gracia M. Quintana-Navarro, Fernando Lopez-Segura, Maria D Luque De Castro, Jose Lopez-Miranda, Antonio Camargo, Francisco Perez-Jimenez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have investigated the effects of the intake of oils heated at frying temperature in order to find an oil model for deep-frying that prevents postprandial oxidative stress. Twenty obese people received four breakfasts following a randomised crossover design consisting of different oils (virgin olive oil (VOO), sunflower oil (SFO), and a mixed seed oil (SFO/canola oil) with added dimethylpolysiloxane (SOX) or natural antioxidants from olives (SOP)), which were subjected to 20 heating cycles. The intake of SFO-breakfast reduced plasma GSH levels and the GSH/GSSG ratio, increased protein carbonyl levels, and induced a higher gene expression of the different NADPH-oxidase subunits, Nrf2-Keap1 activation, gene expression of the antioxidant enzymes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and antioxidant plasma activities than the intake of the breakfasts prepared with VOO, SOP and SOX. Oils with phenolic compounds, whether natural (VOO) or artificially added (SOP), or with artificial antioxidant (SOX), could reduce postprandial oxidative stress compared with sunflower oil.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2250-2259
Number of pages10
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxidative stress
frying
sunflower oil
virgin olive oil
breakfast
Oils
Oxidative Stress
oxidative stress
Antioxidants
Breakfast
antioxidants
oils
Temperature
Gene expression
temperature
Dimethylpolysiloxanes
Plasmas
Oilseeds
gene expression
deep fat frying

Keywords

  • Heated oil
  • Oil additive
  • Oxidative stress
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Postprandial state

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Food Science
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people. / Perez-Herrera, Aleyda; Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol A.; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Marin, Carmen; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Tasset, Inmaculada; Tunez, Isaac; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M.; Lopez-Segura, Fernando; De Castro, Maria D Luque; Lopez-Miranda, Jose; Camargo, Antonio; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco.

In: Food Chemistry, Vol. 138, No. 4, 15.06.2013, p. 2250-2259.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perez-Herrera, A, Rangel-Zuñiga, OA, Delgado-Lista, J, Marin, C, Perez-Martinez, P, Tasset, I, Tunez, I, Quintana-Navarro, GM, Lopez-Segura, F, De Castro, MDL, Lopez-Miranda, J, Camargo, A & Perez-Jimenez, F 2013, 'The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people', Food Chemistry, vol. 138, no. 4, pp. 2250-2259. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2012.12.023
Perez-Herrera, Aleyda ; Rangel-Zuñiga, Oriol A. ; Delgado-Lista, Javier ; Marin, Carmen ; Perez-Martinez, Pablo ; Tasset, Inmaculada ; Tunez, Isaac ; Quintana-Navarro, Gracia M. ; Lopez-Segura, Fernando ; De Castro, Maria D Luque ; Lopez-Miranda, Jose ; Camargo, Antonio ; Perez-Jimenez, Francisco. / The antioxidants in oils heated at frying temperature, whether natural or added, could protect against postprandial oxidative stress in obese people. In: Food Chemistry. 2013 ; Vol. 138, No. 4. pp. 2250-2259.
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