Taxol in ovarian cancer

C. D. Runowicz, P. H. Wiernik, Avi Israel Einzig, G. L. Goldberg, Susan Band Horwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taxol is a structurally complex natural plant product with a novel mechanism of action. The supply of this drug is limited by its low abundance in the bark of the slow-growing yew tree from which it is extracted. The chemical complexity of taxol has hampered the development of a feasible process to synthesize large quantities. Analogues are being made from a precursor found in the needles of the yew tree. However, there is a need to develop a more efficient method to provide adequate supplies of this drug. This review article summarizes the preclinical and clinical studies of taxol in ovarian cancer. Phase I studies have identified the drug's toxicities. Neutropenia has been the dose-limiting toxicity in most trials, and premedications and longer infusion schedules have been used to reduce the incidence and severity of hypersensitivity reactions. The intraperitoneal administration of taxol in Phase I studies showed a pharmacologic advantage with acceptable toxicity. Its activity in ovarian cancer was noticed first in Phase I trials at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University. These observations led to Phase II testing, which documented response rates of 20-35% in patients with relapsed or refractory ovarian cancer. Phase III trials of taxol and cisplatin versus cyclophosphamide and cisplatin in untreated patients with ovarian cancer are in progress. Studies combining taxol with colony-stimulating factors and cisplatin are ongoing. Taxol is an important new drug in ovarian cancer. Its unique mechanism of action and toxicities make it an attractive agent to use in combination with currently active drugs. Future studies will determine the role of taxol in the management of this disease, but the widespread availability of this drug will depend on the development of a feasible synthetic process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1591-1596
Number of pages6
JournalCancer
Volume71
Issue number4 SUPPL.
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Paclitaxel
Ovarian Neoplasms
Cisplatin
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Colony-Stimulating Factors
Premedication
Disease Management
Neutropenia
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Cyclophosphamide
Needles
Appointments and Schedules
Hypersensitivity
Medicine
Incidence

Keywords

  • ovarian neoplasms
  • review article
  • taxol
  • taxotere

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Runowicz, C. D., Wiernik, P. H., Einzig, A. I., Goldberg, G. L., & Band Horwitz, S. (1993). Taxol in ovarian cancer. Cancer, 71(4 SUPPL.), 1591-1596.

Taxol in ovarian cancer. / Runowicz, C. D.; Wiernik, P. H.; Einzig, Avi Israel; Goldberg, G. L.; Band Horwitz, Susan.

In: Cancer, Vol. 71, No. 4 SUPPL., 1993, p. 1591-1596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Runowicz, CD, Wiernik, PH, Einzig, AI, Goldberg, GL & Band Horwitz, S 1993, 'Taxol in ovarian cancer', Cancer, vol. 71, no. 4 SUPPL., pp. 1591-1596.
Runowicz CD, Wiernik PH, Einzig AI, Goldberg GL, Band Horwitz S. Taxol in ovarian cancer. Cancer. 1993;71(4 SUPPL.):1591-1596.
Runowicz, C. D. ; Wiernik, P. H. ; Einzig, Avi Israel ; Goldberg, G. L. ; Band Horwitz, Susan. / Taxol in ovarian cancer. In: Cancer. 1993 ; Vol. 71, No. 4 SUPPL. pp. 1591-1596.
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