Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque

Thomas C. Pritchard, Gary J. Schwartz, Thomas R. Scott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Taste activates about 6% of the neurons in the anterior insula (primary taste cortex) of the macaque. The anterior insula has many direct and indirect projections to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), including the caudolateral OFC (clOFC), where only 2% of the neurons respond to taste. We have identified a 12-mm2 region in the medial OFC (mOFC) where taste represents 7-28% of the population. This rich trove of taste cells has functional characteristics typical of both the insular cortex that projects to it and the clOFC to which it projects. Mean spontaneous rate was 3.1 spikes/s, nearly identical to that in the insula, but double that of the clOFC. In the mOFC, 19% of the taste cells also responded to other modalities, most commonly olfaction and touch, slightly less than the 27% in the clOFC. The distribution of best stimulus neurons was almost even across the four prototypical stimuli in the mOFC, as in insula, but discrepant from the clOFC, where sugar responsiveness dominated. The broadly tuned taste neurons in the mOFC were similar to those in the insula and strikingly different from the more specialized cells of the clOFC. Whereas the responsiveness to the taste of a satiating stimulus declines among the narrowly tuned clOFC cells, satiety has much less impact on the responsiveness of mOFC neurons. The mOFC is a robust area worthy of exploration for its involvement in gustatory coding, the amalgamation of sensory inputs to create flavor, and the hedonics that guide feeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Pages121-135
Number of pages15
Volume1121
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1121
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

Fingerprint

Macaca
Prefrontal Cortex
Neurons
Flavors
Sugars
Pleasure
Smell
Touch
Cerebral Cortex

Keywords

  • Monkey
  • Orbitofrontal cortex
  • Taste

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Pritchard, T. C., Schwartz, G. J., & Scott, T. R. (2007). Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 1121, pp. 121-135). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1121). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1401.007

Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque. / Pritchard, Thomas C.; Schwartz, Gary J.; Scott, Thomas R.

Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1121 2007. p. 121-135 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1121).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Pritchard, TC, Schwartz, GJ & Scott, TR 2007, Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque. in Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. vol. 1121, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1121, pp. 121-135. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1401.007
Pritchard TC, Schwartz GJ, Scott TR. Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque. In Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1121. 2007. p. 121-135. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1401.007
Pritchard, Thomas C. ; Schwartz, Gary J. ; Scott, Thomas R. / Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. Vol. 1121 2007. pp. 121-135 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
@inproceedings{481817556dfc44acbc0dc9e0ce74a407,
title = "Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque",
abstract = "Taste activates about 6{\%} of the neurons in the anterior insula (primary taste cortex) of the macaque. The anterior insula has many direct and indirect projections to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), including the caudolateral OFC (clOFC), where only 2{\%} of the neurons respond to taste. We have identified a 12-mm2 region in the medial OFC (mOFC) where taste represents 7-28{\%} of the population. This rich trove of taste cells has functional characteristics typical of both the insular cortex that projects to it and the clOFC to which it projects. Mean spontaneous rate was 3.1 spikes/s, nearly identical to that in the insula, but double that of the clOFC. In the mOFC, 19{\%} of the taste cells also responded to other modalities, most commonly olfaction and touch, slightly less than the 27{\%} in the clOFC. The distribution of best stimulus neurons was almost even across the four prototypical stimuli in the mOFC, as in insula, but discrepant from the clOFC, where sugar responsiveness dominated. The broadly tuned taste neurons in the mOFC were similar to those in the insula and strikingly different from the more specialized cells of the clOFC. Whereas the responsiveness to the taste of a satiating stimulus declines among the narrowly tuned clOFC cells, satiety has much less impact on the responsiveness of mOFC neurons. The mOFC is a robust area worthy of exploration for its involvement in gustatory coding, the amalgamation of sensory inputs to create flavor, and the hedonics that guide feeding.",
keywords = "Monkey, Orbitofrontal cortex, Taste",
author = "Pritchard, {Thomas C.} and Schwartz, {Gary J.} and Scott, {Thomas R.}",
year = "2007",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1196/annals.1401.007",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781573316835",
volume = "1121",
series = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",
pages = "121--135",
booktitle = "Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Taste in the medial orbitofrontal cortex of the macaque

AU - Pritchard, Thomas C.

AU - Schwartz, Gary J.

AU - Scott, Thomas R.

PY - 2007/12

Y1 - 2007/12

N2 - Taste activates about 6% of the neurons in the anterior insula (primary taste cortex) of the macaque. The anterior insula has many direct and indirect projections to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), including the caudolateral OFC (clOFC), where only 2% of the neurons respond to taste. We have identified a 12-mm2 region in the medial OFC (mOFC) where taste represents 7-28% of the population. This rich trove of taste cells has functional characteristics typical of both the insular cortex that projects to it and the clOFC to which it projects. Mean spontaneous rate was 3.1 spikes/s, nearly identical to that in the insula, but double that of the clOFC. In the mOFC, 19% of the taste cells also responded to other modalities, most commonly olfaction and touch, slightly less than the 27% in the clOFC. The distribution of best stimulus neurons was almost even across the four prototypical stimuli in the mOFC, as in insula, but discrepant from the clOFC, where sugar responsiveness dominated. The broadly tuned taste neurons in the mOFC were similar to those in the insula and strikingly different from the more specialized cells of the clOFC. Whereas the responsiveness to the taste of a satiating stimulus declines among the narrowly tuned clOFC cells, satiety has much less impact on the responsiveness of mOFC neurons. The mOFC is a robust area worthy of exploration for its involvement in gustatory coding, the amalgamation of sensory inputs to create flavor, and the hedonics that guide feeding.

AB - Taste activates about 6% of the neurons in the anterior insula (primary taste cortex) of the macaque. The anterior insula has many direct and indirect projections to the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), including the caudolateral OFC (clOFC), where only 2% of the neurons respond to taste. We have identified a 12-mm2 region in the medial OFC (mOFC) where taste represents 7-28% of the population. This rich trove of taste cells has functional characteristics typical of both the insular cortex that projects to it and the clOFC to which it projects. Mean spontaneous rate was 3.1 spikes/s, nearly identical to that in the insula, but double that of the clOFC. In the mOFC, 19% of the taste cells also responded to other modalities, most commonly olfaction and touch, slightly less than the 27% in the clOFC. The distribution of best stimulus neurons was almost even across the four prototypical stimuli in the mOFC, as in insula, but discrepant from the clOFC, where sugar responsiveness dominated. The broadly tuned taste neurons in the mOFC were similar to those in the insula and strikingly different from the more specialized cells of the clOFC. Whereas the responsiveness to the taste of a satiating stimulus declines among the narrowly tuned clOFC cells, satiety has much less impact on the responsiveness of mOFC neurons. The mOFC is a robust area worthy of exploration for its involvement in gustatory coding, the amalgamation of sensory inputs to create flavor, and the hedonics that guide feeding.

KW - Monkey

KW - Orbitofrontal cortex

KW - Taste

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=37549037390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=37549037390&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1196/annals.1401.007

DO - 10.1196/annals.1401.007

M3 - Conference contribution

C2 - 17698994

AN - SCOPUS:37549037390

SN - 9781573316835

VL - 1121

T3 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

SP - 121

EP - 135

BT - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences

ER -