Systemic lupus erythematosus in males: a retrospective study with a review of the literature.

R. D. Poduval, S. Bananian, K. S. Kumar, Barry J. Fomberstein

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To delineate the clinical pattern of a cohort of male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and compare it with previously reported data. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records. SUBJECTS: Male patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed with SLE and admitted to a 500-bed university hospital between 1990 and 1998. Eight of the men were African-American and three were Latino. The mean age was 36 years (range, 29-46). METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data were collected according to a well-established protocol. Imaging and invasive studies (including aspirations and biopsies) were also recorded. RESULTS: Nine of the patients (82%) had renal involvement, with five needing dialysis within a year of presentation. Five patients had neurologic involvement: two presented with psychosis and three with seizures. Eight patients had hematologic involvement, and seven had serosal and articular involvement. Cutaneous lesions (discoid lupus) were noted in only one patient. A majority of the patients were noncompliant and were lost to follow-up; therefore, ultimate outcome could not be clearly delineated. CONCLUSION: Renal, serosal, neurologic, articular, and hematologic involvement occurred frequently in our sample of male patients with SLE. The most striking finding was the high frequency of renal involvement with poor prognosis. A high index of suspicion for SLE in males may permit earlier diagnosis and may dictate the need for more aggressive therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)29-32
Number of pages4
JournalThe journal of gender-specific medicine : JGSM : the official journal of the Partnership for Women"s Health at Columbia
Volume3
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jul 2000

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Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Retrospective Studies
Kidney
Nervous System
Joints
Hospital Records
Lost to Follow-Up
Needle Biopsy
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Psychotic Disorders
Early Diagnosis
Dialysis
Seizures
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Systemic lupus erythematosus in males: a retrospective study with a review of the literature.",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To delineate the clinical pattern of a cohort of male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and compare it with previously reported data. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records. SUBJECTS: Male patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed with SLE and admitted to a 500-bed university hospital between 1990 and 1998. Eight of the men were African-American and three were Latino. The mean age was 36 years (range, 29-46). METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data were collected according to a well-established protocol. Imaging and invasive studies (including aspirations and biopsies) were also recorded. RESULTS: Nine of the patients (82{\%}) had renal involvement, with five needing dialysis within a year of presentation. Five patients had neurologic involvement: two presented with psychosis and three with seizures. Eight patients had hematologic involvement, and seven had serosal and articular involvement. Cutaneous lesions (discoid lupus) were noted in only one patient. A majority of the patients were noncompliant and were lost to follow-up; therefore, ultimate outcome could not be clearly delineated. CONCLUSION: Renal, serosal, neurologic, articular, and hematologic involvement occurred frequently in our sample of male patients with SLE. The most striking finding was the high frequency of renal involvement with poor prognosis. A high index of suspicion for SLE in males may permit earlier diagnosis and may dictate the need for more aggressive therapy.",
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T1 - Systemic lupus erythematosus in males

T2 - a retrospective study with a review of the literature.

AU - Poduval, R. D.

AU - Bananian, S.

AU - Kumar, K. S.

AU - Fomberstein, Barry J.

PY - 2000/7

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To delineate the clinical pattern of a cohort of male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and compare it with previously reported data. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records. SUBJECTS: Male patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed with SLE and admitted to a 500-bed university hospital between 1990 and 1998. Eight of the men were African-American and three were Latino. The mean age was 36 years (range, 29-46). METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data were collected according to a well-established protocol. Imaging and invasive studies (including aspirations and biopsies) were also recorded. RESULTS: Nine of the patients (82%) had renal involvement, with five needing dialysis within a year of presentation. Five patients had neurologic involvement: two presented with psychosis and three with seizures. Eight patients had hematologic involvement, and seven had serosal and articular involvement. Cutaneous lesions (discoid lupus) were noted in only one patient. A majority of the patients were noncompliant and were lost to follow-up; therefore, ultimate outcome could not be clearly delineated. CONCLUSION: Renal, serosal, neurologic, articular, and hematologic involvement occurred frequently in our sample of male patients with SLE. The most striking finding was the high frequency of renal involvement with poor prognosis. A high index of suspicion for SLE in males may permit earlier diagnosis and may dictate the need for more aggressive therapy.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To delineate the clinical pattern of a cohort of male patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and compare it with previously reported data. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records. SUBJECTS: Male patients (n = 11) who were diagnosed with SLE and admitted to a 500-bed university hospital between 1990 and 1998. Eight of the men were African-American and three were Latino. The mean age was 36 years (range, 29-46). METHODS: Clinical and laboratory data were collected according to a well-established protocol. Imaging and invasive studies (including aspirations and biopsies) were also recorded. RESULTS: Nine of the patients (82%) had renal involvement, with five needing dialysis within a year of presentation. Five patients had neurologic involvement: two presented with psychosis and three with seizures. Eight patients had hematologic involvement, and seven had serosal and articular involvement. Cutaneous lesions (discoid lupus) were noted in only one patient. A majority of the patients were noncompliant and were lost to follow-up; therefore, ultimate outcome could not be clearly delineated. CONCLUSION: Renal, serosal, neurologic, articular, and hematologic involvement occurred frequently in our sample of male patients with SLE. The most striking finding was the high frequency of renal involvement with poor prognosis. A high index of suspicion for SLE in males may permit earlier diagnosis and may dictate the need for more aggressive therapy.

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