Synopsis of Galago species characteristics

Leanne T. Nash, Simon K. Bearder, Todd R. Olson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

At the time of the symposium, "Variability Within the Galagos," at the 1986 IPS Congress, most participants were still using Hill's (1953) classification and nomenclature of galago species. All participants expressed some degree of dissatisfaction with Hill's species groups. Many described how it was proving increasingly problematic and inadequate as a means to organize newly collected laboratory, museum, and field data. By the end of the symposium, a consensus about species diversity had emerged which synthesized the current state of knowledge about galagos. The consensus of the participants was that the 11 species, identified by Olson (1979, 1986), most closely approximates the available data about galago species diversity. The 11 species are described.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-80
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Primatology
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1989

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Galago
species diversity
nomenclature
museum

Keywords

  • classification
  • Galago species
  • variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Synopsis of Galago species characteristics. / Nash, Leanne T.; Bearder, Simon K.; Olson, Todd R.

In: International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 10, No. 1, 02.1989, p. 57-80.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nash, Leanne T. ; Bearder, Simon K. ; Olson, Todd R. / Synopsis of Galago species characteristics. In: International Journal of Primatology. 1989 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 57-80.
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