Synaptogenic pathways

Peri T. Kurshan, Kang Shen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

During synaptogenesis, presynaptic and postsynaptic assembly are driven by diverse molecular mechanisms, mediated by intrinsic as well as extrinsic factors. How these processes are initiated and coordinated are open questions. Synapse specificity, or synaptic partner selection, is widely understood to be determined by the trans-synaptic binding of cell adhesion molecules. However, in vivo evidence that cell adhesion molecules subsequently function to initiate synapse assembly, as initially proposed, is lacking. Here, we present a summary of our current understanding of synaptogenic pathways that mediate presynaptic and postsynaptic assembly and the coordination of these processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-162
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurobiology
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Cell Adhesion Molecules
Synapses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Synaptogenic pathways. / Kurshan, Peri T.; Shen, Kang.

In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology, Vol. 57, 08.2019, p. 156-162.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kurshan, Peri T. ; Shen, Kang. / Synaptogenic pathways. In: Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 2019 ; Vol. 57. pp. 156-162.
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