Surgical resection after neoadjuvant durvalumab and radiation is feasible and safe in non–small cell lung cancer: Results from a randomized trial

Benjamin Lee, Nathan Mynard, Abu Nasar, Jonathan Villena-Vargas, Oliver Chow, Sebron Harrison, Brendon Stiles, Jeffrey Port, Nasser Altorki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Several trials have recently reported the safety of pulmonary resection after neoadjuvant immunotherapy with encouraging major pathological response rates. We report the detailed adverse events profile from a recently conducted randomized phase II trial in patients with resectable non–small cell lung cancer treated with neoadjuvant durvalumab alone or with sub-ablative radiation. Methods: We conducted a randomized phase II trial in patients with non–small cell lung cancer clinical stages I to IIIA who were randomly assigned to receive neoadjuvant durvalumab alone or with sub-ablative radiation (8Gyx3). Secondary end points included the safety of 2 cycles of preoperative durvalumab with and without radiation followed by pulmonary resection. Postoperative adverse events within 30 days were recorded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 4.0). Results: Sixty patients were enrolled and randomly assigned, with planned resection performed in 26 patients in each arm. Baseline demographics and clinical variables were balanced between groups. The median operative time was similar between arms: 128 minutes (97-201) versus 146 minutes (109-214) (P =.314). There was no 30- or 90-day mortality. Grade 3/4 adverse events occurred in 10 of 26 patients (38%) after monotherapy and in 10 of 26 patients (38%) after dual therapy. Anemia requiring transfusion and hypotension were the 2 most common adverse events. The median length of stay was similar between arms (5 days vs 4 days, P =.172). Conclusions: In this randomized trial, the addition of sub-ablative focal radiation to durvalumab in the neoadjuvant setting was not associated with increased mortality or morbidity compared with neoadjuvant durvalumab alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • immunotherapy
  • non–small cell lung cancer
  • radiotherapy
  • surgical resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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