Suppression of experimental antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus in mice by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies

Yaron Tomer, M. Blank, Yehuda Shoenfeld

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate whether anti-CD4 antibodies can suppress experimental antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) induced by an anti-DNA monoclonal antibody (MAb). Methods. BALB/c mice were treated with anti-CD4 MAb either before or 2 months after induction of experimental APS and SLE. Control mice were treated with rat IgG or phosphate buffered saline. Serologic and clinical manifestations of the disease were determined. Results. Treatment of mice with anti-CD4 before or 2 months after disease induction prevented the development of experimental APS and SLE. The treated mice did not develop leukopenia or proteinuria, and had fewer episodes of fetal resorption. Similarly, the treated mice did not develop elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time, or thrombocytopenia, and had significantly lower levels of antibodies to double-stranded DNA, histones, MIV-7, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylserine. Levels of CD4+ cells in the lymph nodes declined temporarily after the treatment and then returned to normal. Conclusion. Anti-CD4 antibodies can prevent experimental APS and SLE. These results may suggest a role for anti-CD4 treatment in human autoimmune diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1236-1244
Number of pages9
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1994
Externally publishedYes

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Antiphospholipid Syndrome
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Monoclonal Antibodies
Anti-Idiotypic Antibodies
Fetal Resorption
Cardiolipins
Partial Thromboplastin Time
Antinuclear Antibodies
Blood Sedimentation
Phosphatidylserines
Leukopenia
Proteinuria
Thrombocytopenia
Histones
Autoimmune Diseases
Immunoglobulin G
Lymph Nodes
Phosphates
Antibodies
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Suppression of experimental antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus in mice by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies. / Tomer, Yaron; Blank, M.; Shoenfeld, Yehuda.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 37, No. 8, 08.1994, p. 1236-1244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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