Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival

Michelle C. Odden, Laura M. Yee, Alice M. Arnold, Jason L. Sanders, Calvin Hirsch, Christopher Defilippi, Jorge Kizer, Marco Inzitari, Anne B. Newman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To determine the contribution of gradations of subclinical vascular disease (SVD) to the likelihood of longer survival and to determine what allows some individuals with SVD to live longer. Design Cohort study. Setting Cardiovascular Health Study. Participants Individuals born between June 30, 1918, and June 30, 1921 (N = 2,082; aged 70-75 at baseline (1992-93)). Measurements A SVD index was scored as 0 for no abnormalities, 1 for mild abnormalities, and 2 for severe abnormalities on ankle-arm index, electrocardiogram, and common carotid intima-media thickness measured at baseline. Survival groups were categorized as 80 and younger, 81 to 84, 85 to 89, and 90 and older. Results A 1-point lower SVD score was associated with 1.22 greater odds (95% confidence interval = 1.14-1.31) of longer survival, independent of potential confounders. This association was unchanged after adjustment for intermediate incident cardiovascular events. There was suggestion of an interaction between kidney function, smoking, and C-reactive protein and SVD; the association between SVD and longer survival appeared to be modestly greater in persons with poor kidney function, inflammation, or a history of smoking. Conclusion A lower burden of SVD is associated with longer survival, independent of intermediate cardiovascular events. Abstinence from smoking, better kidney function, and lower inflammation may attenuate the effects of higher SVD and promote longer survival.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1692-1698
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume62
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Fingerprint

Vascular Diseases
Survival
Smoking
Kidney
Inflammation
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Ankle
C-Reactive Protein
Electrocardiography
Arm
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Health

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • inflammation
  • kidney function
  • smoking
  • subclinical disease
  • survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Odden, M. C., Yee, L. M., Arnold, A. M., Sanders, J. L., Hirsch, C., Defilippi, C., ... Newman, A. B. (2014). Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 62(9), 1692-1698. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13018

Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival. / Odden, Michelle C.; Yee, Laura M.; Arnold, Alice M.; Sanders, Jason L.; Hirsch, Calvin; Defilippi, Christopher; Kizer, Jorge; Inzitari, Marco; Newman, Anne B.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 62, No. 9, 01.09.2014, p. 1692-1698.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Odden, MC, Yee, LM, Arnold, AM, Sanders, JL, Hirsch, C, Defilippi, C, Kizer, J, Inzitari, M & Newman, AB 2014, 'Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival', Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 62, no. 9, pp. 1692-1698. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13018
Odden MC, Yee LM, Arnold AM, Sanders JL, Hirsch C, Defilippi C et al. Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2014 Sep 1;62(9):1692-1698. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.13018
Odden, Michelle C. ; Yee, Laura M. ; Arnold, Alice M. ; Sanders, Jason L. ; Hirsch, Calvin ; Defilippi, Christopher ; Kizer, Jorge ; Inzitari, Marco ; Newman, Anne B. / Subclinical vascular disease burden and longer survival. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2014 ; Vol. 62, No. 9. pp. 1692-1698.
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