Le bégaiement: Mise à jour clinique et de la recherche

Translated title of the contribution: Stuttering: Clinical and research update

Hector R. Perez, James H. Stoeckle

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To provide an update on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. Quality of evidence The MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for past and recent studies on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. Most recommendations are based on small studies, limited-quality evidence, or consensus. Main message Stuttering is a speech disorder, common in persons of all ages, that affects normal fluency and time patterning of speech. Stuttering has been associated with differences in brain anatomy, functioning, and dopamine regulation thought to be due to genetic causes. Attention to making a correct diagnosis or referral in children is important because there is growing consensus that early intervention with speech therapy for children who stutter is critical. For adults, stuttering can be associated with substantial psychosocial morbidity including social anxiety and low quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment has received attention in recent years, but clinical evidence is limited. The mainstay of treatment for children and adults remains speech therapy. Conclusion A growing body of research has attempted to uncover the pathophysiology of stuttering. Referral for speech therapy remains the best option for children and adults.

Original languageFrench
JournalCanadian Family Physician
Volume62
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Stuttering
Speech Therapy
Research
Molecular Epidemiology
Consensus
Referral and Consultation
Speech Disorders
Therapeutics
MEDLINE
Dopamine
Anatomy
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Databases
Morbidity
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Le bégaiement : Mise à jour clinique et de la recherche. / Perez, Hector R.; Stoeckle, James H.

In: Canadian Family Physician, Vol. 62, No. 6, 01.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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N2 - Objective To provide an update on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. Quality of evidence The MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for past and recent studies on the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of developmental stuttering. Most recommendations are based on small studies, limited-quality evidence, or consensus. Main message Stuttering is a speech disorder, common in persons of all ages, that affects normal fluency and time patterning of speech. Stuttering has been associated with differences in brain anatomy, functioning, and dopamine regulation thought to be due to genetic causes. Attention to making a correct diagnosis or referral in children is important because there is growing consensus that early intervention with speech therapy for children who stutter is critical. For adults, stuttering can be associated with substantial psychosocial morbidity including social anxiety and low quality of life. Pharmacologic treatment has received attention in recent years, but clinical evidence is limited. The mainstay of treatment for children and adults remains speech therapy. Conclusion A growing body of research has attempted to uncover the pathophysiology of stuttering. Referral for speech therapy remains the best option for children and adults.

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