Studying exit and surface delivery of post-golgi transport intermediates using in vitro and live-cell microscopy-based approaches

Geri E. Kreitzer, Anne Muesch, Charles Yeaman, Enrique Rodriguez-Boulan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter examines exit and surface delivery of post-golgi transport intermediates using in vitro and live-cell microscopy-based approaches. The most important advance provided by cDNA microinjection and adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in examining protein-sorting events is the ability to co-introduce two or more genes into cells and express simultaneously multiple secretory cargoes that follow divergent routes out of the TGN. This allows one to evaluate the role(s) of potential molecular effectors of protein sorting and targeting to different cellular domains. While cDNA microinjection is limited with respect to the number of cells that can be evaluated, it is exquisitely suited to live cell imaging studies aimed at evaluating highly dynamic membrane trafficking events occurring at specific points throughout the biosynthetic pathway. Semi-intact MDCK cells are prepared after accumulating marker proteins in the TGN. Cells are first swollen in a low salt buffer and are subsequently scraped from the substratum, which produces large tears in the plasma membrane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCell Biology, Four-Volume Set
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages189-199
Number of pages11
Volume2
ISBN (Print)9780121647308
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Microscopy
Microscopic examination
Protein Transport
Sorting
Microinjections
Complementary DNA
Gene transfer
Proteins
Cell membranes
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Biosynthetic Pathways
Buffers
Salts
Genes
Tears
Membranes
Imaging techniques
Cell Count
Cell Membrane
In Vitro Techniques

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Kreitzer, G. E., Muesch, A., Yeaman, C., & Rodriguez-Boulan, E. (2006). Studying exit and surface delivery of post-golgi transport intermediates using in vitro and live-cell microscopy-based approaches. In Cell Biology, Four-Volume Set (Vol. 2, pp. 189-199). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012164730-8/50099-X

Studying exit and surface delivery of post-golgi transport intermediates using in vitro and live-cell microscopy-based approaches. / Kreitzer, Geri E.; Muesch, Anne; Yeaman, Charles; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique.

Cell Biology, Four-Volume Set. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2006. p. 189-199.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kreitzer, Geri E. ; Muesch, Anne ; Yeaman, Charles ; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique. / Studying exit and surface delivery of post-golgi transport intermediates using in vitro and live-cell microscopy-based approaches. Cell Biology, Four-Volume Set. Vol. 2 Elsevier Inc., 2006. pp. 189-199
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