Strategies for ultrastructural visualization of biotinated probes hybridized to messenger RNA in situ.

Robert H. Singer, J. B. Lawrence, F. Silva, G. L. Langevin, M. Pomeroy, S. Billings-Gagliardi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A progressive development of the application of in situ methodology to ultrastructural procedures has resulted in the ability to detect individual molecules of mRNA with high probability. Beginning with whole-mount cells and then developing myotubes, both in culture and detergent extracted before fixation, we were able to progress to methods which allow detection of mRNA in tissue sections. Initial results confirm that the detection of mRNA in thin-sectioned tissue is very similar to observations on the extracted, cultured cells, and that the same methods of data analysis apply. Current work is devoted to the application of the methodology to other cellular structures, such as the nucleus, and to other tissue-probe systems, such as brain. Acknowledgements. The authors appreciate the skilled help from John McNeil and Shirwin Pockwinse in the laborious and time-consuming preparations of material and photography. FS was on sabbatical leave from the Department of Pathology at Southwestern Medical Center.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-69
Number of pages15
JournalCurrent Topics in Microbiology and Immunology
Volume143
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Messenger RNA
Photography
Skeletal Muscle Fibers
Cellular Structures
Detergents
Cultured Cells
Pathology
Brain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Microbiology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Singer, R. H., Lawrence, J. B., Silva, F., Langevin, G. L., Pomeroy, M., & Billings-Gagliardi, S. (1989). Strategies for ultrastructural visualization of biotinated probes hybridized to messenger RNA in situ. Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, 143, 55-69.

Strategies for ultrastructural visualization of biotinated probes hybridized to messenger RNA in situ. / Singer, Robert H.; Lawrence, J. B.; Silva, F.; Langevin, G. L.; Pomeroy, M.; Billings-Gagliardi, S.

In: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, Vol. 143, 1989, p. 55-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Singer, RH, Lawrence, JB, Silva, F, Langevin, GL, Pomeroy, M & Billings-Gagliardi, S 1989, 'Strategies for ultrastructural visualization of biotinated probes hybridized to messenger RNA in situ.', Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology, vol. 143, pp. 55-69.
Singer, Robert H. ; Lawrence, J. B. ; Silva, F. ; Langevin, G. L. ; Pomeroy, M. ; Billings-Gagliardi, S. / Strategies for ultrastructural visualization of biotinated probes hybridized to messenger RNA in situ. In: Current Topics in Microbiology and Immunology. 1989 ; Vol. 143. pp. 55-69.
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