Stages of retrieval in verbal learning

Paula Altman Fuld, Herman Buschke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analysis of storage, retention, and retrieval in standard free recall, extended free recall, and repeated recall after a single presentation indicates that most recall failures are retrieval failures, and that extended recall decreases retrieval failure and increases consistent retrieval. Stages of random and consistent retrieval account for total recall in terms of items consistently retrieved from the beginning, items stored for random retrieval, items actually retrieved at random, and additional items reaching the stage of consistent retrieval. The distinction between stages of random and consistent retrieval is supported by showing that random retrieval does not improve prior to the abrupt onset of consistent retrieval. This also indicates that increasing recall is due to the increasing number of consistently retrieved items.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-410
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1968

Fingerprint

Verbal Learning
learning
Retention (Psychology)

Cite this

Stages of retrieval in verbal learning. / Fuld, Paula Altman; Buschke, Herman.

In: Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 4, 1968, p. 401-410.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3d016c36e837400e921490104f291eda,
title = "Stages of retrieval in verbal learning",
abstract = "Analysis of storage, retention, and retrieval in standard free recall, extended free recall, and repeated recall after a single presentation indicates that most recall failures are retrieval failures, and that extended recall decreases retrieval failure and increases consistent retrieval. Stages of random and consistent retrieval account for total recall in terms of items consistently retrieved from the beginning, items stored for random retrieval, items actually retrieved at random, and additional items reaching the stage of consistent retrieval. The distinction between stages of random and consistent retrieval is supported by showing that random retrieval does not improve prior to the abrupt onset of consistent retrieval. This also indicates that increasing recall is due to the increasing number of consistently retrieved items.",
author = "Fuld, {Paula Altman} and Herman Buschke",
year = "1968",
doi = "10.1016/S0022-5371(76)90035-9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
pages = "401--410",
journal = "Journal of Memory and Language",
issn = "0749-596X",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stages of retrieval in verbal learning

AU - Fuld, Paula Altman

AU - Buschke, Herman

PY - 1968

Y1 - 1968

N2 - Analysis of storage, retention, and retrieval in standard free recall, extended free recall, and repeated recall after a single presentation indicates that most recall failures are retrieval failures, and that extended recall decreases retrieval failure and increases consistent retrieval. Stages of random and consistent retrieval account for total recall in terms of items consistently retrieved from the beginning, items stored for random retrieval, items actually retrieved at random, and additional items reaching the stage of consistent retrieval. The distinction between stages of random and consistent retrieval is supported by showing that random retrieval does not improve prior to the abrupt onset of consistent retrieval. This also indicates that increasing recall is due to the increasing number of consistently retrieved items.

AB - Analysis of storage, retention, and retrieval in standard free recall, extended free recall, and repeated recall after a single presentation indicates that most recall failures are retrieval failures, and that extended recall decreases retrieval failure and increases consistent retrieval. Stages of random and consistent retrieval account for total recall in terms of items consistently retrieved from the beginning, items stored for random retrieval, items actually retrieved at random, and additional items reaching the stage of consistent retrieval. The distinction between stages of random and consistent retrieval is supported by showing that random retrieval does not improve prior to the abrupt onset of consistent retrieval. This also indicates that increasing recall is due to the increasing number of consistently retrieved items.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0007052878&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0007052878&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0022-5371(76)90035-9

DO - 10.1016/S0022-5371(76)90035-9

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 401

EP - 410

JO - Journal of Memory and Language

JF - Journal of Memory and Language

SN - 0749-596X

IS - 4

ER -