Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of chronic migraine and episodic migraine sufferers

D. C. Buse, A. Manack, D. Serrano, C. Turkel, Richard B. Lipton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

268 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To characterise and compare the sociodemographic profiles and the frequency of common comorbidities for adults with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM) in a large population-based sample. Methods The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a longitudinal, population-based, survey. Data from the 2005 survey were analysed to assess differences in sociodemographic profiles and rates of common comorbidities between two groups of respondents: CM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; $15 days of headache per month) and EM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; 0e14 days of headache per month). Categories of comorbid conditions included psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, pain and 'other' such as obesity and diabetes. Results Of 24 000 headache sufferers surveyed in 2005, 655 respondents had CM, and 11 249 respondents had EM. Compared with EM, respondents with CM had stastically significant lower levels of household income, were less likely to be employed full time and were more likely to be occupationally disabled. Those with CM were approximately twice as likely to have depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Respiratory disorders including asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiac risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity, were also significantly more likely to be reported by those with CM. Discussion Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of the CM population differ from the EM population on multiple dimensions, suggesting that CM and EM differ in important ways other than headache frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-432
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume81
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2010

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Comorbidity
Headache
Population
Obesity
Bronchitis
Chronic Pain
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Psychiatry
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Surgery

Cite this

Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of chronic migraine and episodic migraine sufferers. / Buse, D. C.; Manack, A.; Serrano, D.; Turkel, C.; Lipton, Richard B.

In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Vol. 81, No. 4, 04.2010, p. 428-432.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{88a91eefc91f4bcdb466a8dce11d8c4f,
title = "Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of chronic migraine and episodic migraine sufferers",
abstract = "Objective To characterise and compare the sociodemographic profiles and the frequency of common comorbidities for adults with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM) in a large population-based sample. Methods The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a longitudinal, population-based, survey. Data from the 2005 survey were analysed to assess differences in sociodemographic profiles and rates of common comorbidities between two groups of respondents: CM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; $15 days of headache per month) and EM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; 0e14 days of headache per month). Categories of comorbid conditions included psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, pain and 'other' such as obesity and diabetes. Results Of 24 000 headache sufferers surveyed in 2005, 655 respondents had CM, and 11 249 respondents had EM. Compared with EM, respondents with CM had stastically significant lower levels of household income, were less likely to be employed full time and were more likely to be occupationally disabled. Those with CM were approximately twice as likely to have depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Respiratory disorders including asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiac risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity, were also significantly more likely to be reported by those with CM. Discussion Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of the CM population differ from the EM population on multiple dimensions, suggesting that CM and EM differ in important ways other than headache frequency.",
author = "Buse, {D. C.} and A. Manack and D. Serrano and C. Turkel and Lipton, {Richard B.}",
year = "2010",
month = "4",
doi = "0.1136/jnnp.2009.192492",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "81",
pages = "428--432",
journal = "Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry",
issn = "0022-3050",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of chronic migraine and episodic migraine sufferers

AU - Buse, D. C.

AU - Manack, A.

AU - Serrano, D.

AU - Turkel, C.

AU - Lipton, Richard B.

PY - 2010/4

Y1 - 2010/4

N2 - Objective To characterise and compare the sociodemographic profiles and the frequency of common comorbidities for adults with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM) in a large population-based sample. Methods The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a longitudinal, population-based, survey. Data from the 2005 survey were analysed to assess differences in sociodemographic profiles and rates of common comorbidities between two groups of respondents: CM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; $15 days of headache per month) and EM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; 0e14 days of headache per month). Categories of comorbid conditions included psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, pain and 'other' such as obesity and diabetes. Results Of 24 000 headache sufferers surveyed in 2005, 655 respondents had CM, and 11 249 respondents had EM. Compared with EM, respondents with CM had stastically significant lower levels of household income, were less likely to be employed full time and were more likely to be occupationally disabled. Those with CM were approximately twice as likely to have depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Respiratory disorders including asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiac risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity, were also significantly more likely to be reported by those with CM. Discussion Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of the CM population differ from the EM population on multiple dimensions, suggesting that CM and EM differ in important ways other than headache frequency.

AB - Objective To characterise and compare the sociodemographic profiles and the frequency of common comorbidities for adults with chronic migraine (CM) and episodic migraine (EM) in a large population-based sample. Methods The American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) study is a longitudinal, population-based, survey. Data from the 2005 survey were analysed to assess differences in sociodemographic profiles and rates of common comorbidities between two groups of respondents: CM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; $15 days of headache per month) and EM (ICHD-2 defined migraine; 0e14 days of headache per month). Categories of comorbid conditions included psychiatric, respiratory, cardiovascular, pain and 'other' such as obesity and diabetes. Results Of 24 000 headache sufferers surveyed in 2005, 655 respondents had CM, and 11 249 respondents had EM. Compared with EM, respondents with CM had stastically significant lower levels of household income, were less likely to be employed full time and were more likely to be occupationally disabled. Those with CM were approximately twice as likely to have depression, anxiety and chronic pain. Respiratory disorders including asthma, bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiac risk factors including hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity, were also significantly more likely to be reported by those with CM. Discussion Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of the CM population differ from the EM population on multiple dimensions, suggesting that CM and EM differ in important ways other than headache frequency.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77950597744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77950597744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 0.1136/jnnp.2009.192492

DO - 0.1136/jnnp.2009.192492

M3 - Article

VL - 81

SP - 428

EP - 432

JO - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry

SN - 0022-3050

IS - 4

ER -