Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis

Jeannette M. Beasley, Polly A. Newcomb, Amy Trentham-Dietz, John M. Hampton, Rachel M. Ceballos, Linda Titus-Ernstoff, Kathleen M. Egan, Michelle D. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Evidence has been inconsistent regarding the impact of social networks on survival after breast cancer diagnosis. We prospectively examined the relation between components of social integration and survival in a large cohort of breast cancer survivors. Methods: Women (N = 4,589) diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were recruited from a population-based, multi-center, case-control study. A median of 5.6 years (Interquartile Range 2.7-8.7) after breast cancer diagnosis, women completed a questionnaire on recent post-diagnosis social networks and other lifestyle factors. Social networks were measured using components of the Berkman-Syme Social Networks Index to create a measure of social connectedness. Based on a search of the National Death Index, 552 deaths (146 related to breast cancer) were identified. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Higher scores on a composite measure of social connectedness as determined by the frequency of contacts with family and friends, attendance of religious services, and participation in community activities was associated with a 15-28% reduced risk of death from any cause (p-trend = 0.02). Inverse trends were observed between all-cause mortality and frequency of attendance at religious services (p-trend = 0.0001) and hours per week engaged in community activities (p-trend = 0.0005). No material associations were identified between social networks and breast cancer-specific mortality. Conclusions: Engagement in activities outside the home was associated with lower overall mortality after breast cancer diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)372-380
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Cancer Survivorship
Volume4
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Social Support
Breast Neoplasms
Survival
Mortality
Survivors
Case-Control Studies
Life Style
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Population

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer
  • Mortality
  • Oncology
  • Social networks
  • Survival

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Beasley, J. M., Newcomb, P. A., Trentham-Dietz, A., Hampton, J. M., Ceballos, R. M., Titus-Ernstoff, L., ... Holmes, M. D. (2010). Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 4(4), 372-380. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-010-0139-5

Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis. / Beasley, Jeannette M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M.; Ceballos, Rachel M.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M.; Holmes, Michelle D.

In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship, Vol. 4, No. 4, 12.2010, p. 372-380.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Beasley, JM, Newcomb, PA, Trentham-Dietz, A, Hampton, JM, Ceballos, RM, Titus-Ernstoff, L, Egan, KM & Holmes, MD 2010, 'Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis', Journal of Cancer Survivorship, vol. 4, no. 4, pp. 372-380. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-010-0139-5
Beasley JM, Newcomb PA, Trentham-Dietz A, Hampton JM, Ceballos RM, Titus-Ernstoff L et al. Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2010 Dec;4(4):372-380. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11764-010-0139-5
Beasley, Jeannette M. ; Newcomb, Polly A. ; Trentham-Dietz, Amy ; Hampton, John M. ; Ceballos, Rachel M. ; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda ; Egan, Kathleen M. ; Holmes, Michelle D. / Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis. In: Journal of Cancer Survivorship. 2010 ; Vol. 4, No. 4. pp. 372-380.
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