Social capital and periodontal disease in Hispanic/Latino adults in the United States: Results from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos

Nadia Laniado, Victor M. Badner, Anne E. Sanders, Richard H. Singer, Tracy L. Finlayson, Simin Hua, Linda M. Kaste, Carmen R. Isasi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: To examine the association of social capital with periodontal disease severity. Materials and Methods: We analysed data obtained from 3,994 men and women aged 18–74 years in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study (HCHS/SOL SCAS). From 2008 to 2011, dentists assessed periodontitis status with a full-mouth periodontal examination. Periodontitis was classified using standardized case definitions. Multivariable logistic regression estimated odds of moderate–severe periodontitis associated with two measures of social capital: structural support (Social Network Index) and functional support (Interpersonal Support Evaluation List). Results: For US-born participants, for each additional person in their social network, the adjusted odds of moderate–severe periodontitis was reduced 17% (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.71, 0.96). However, no association was found between functional support and periodontal disease severity. Conclusions: Greater structural social support was associated with a lower prevalence of moderate–severe periodontitis in US-born Hispanics/Latinos. These findings suggest that US-born Hispanics/Latinos with less social support represent a vulnerable segment of the population at high-risk group for periodontal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-551
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Clinical Periodontology
Volume47
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • Hispanics
  • periodontal disease
  • social capital
  • social network
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Periodontics

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