Sleep health literacy in head start families and staff: Exploratory study of knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Healthy child development requires sufficient, quality sleep. Sleep problems in early childhood impair social-emotional and cognitive function and increase obesity risk. From a health literacy framework, "sleep health literacy" denotes the knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep and to recognize a sleep problem. Design: To explore the untapped potential of early childhood education (ECE) programs to promote sleep health literacy, we surveyed staff (n = 63) and parents (n = 196) in Head Start about sleep-related knowledge, attitudes/beliefs, sleep hygiene, and sleep problems. Head Start is the largest ECE program in the United States. Results: Most parents believed that their child had healthy sleep habits (81%); few believed that he or she had a sleep problem (10%). Yet, unhealthy bedtime practices and insufficient sleep for age were reported in 50% and 33% of children, respectively. Between 10% and 12% of children had 1 or more sleep onset or awakening problems. Every unhealthy bedtime practice but one was associated with a sleep problem; parental presence at bedtime was associated with the most problems. Insufficient sleep was significantly associated with unhealthy sleep practices. More children with late vs early bedtimes (48% vs14%, P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-24
Number of pages6
JournalSleep Health
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

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Health Literacy
Motivation
Sleep
Sleep-Wake Transition Disorders
Parents
Education
Child Development
Cognition

Keywords

  • Early childhood education
  • Health literacy
  • Sleep
  • Sleep health literacy
  • Sleep problems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

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title = "Sleep health literacy in head start families and staff: Exploratory study of knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep",
abstract = "Context: Healthy child development requires sufficient, quality sleep. Sleep problems in early childhood impair social-emotional and cognitive function and increase obesity risk. From a health literacy framework, {"}sleep health literacy{"} denotes the knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep and to recognize a sleep problem. Design: To explore the untapped potential of early childhood education (ECE) programs to promote sleep health literacy, we surveyed staff (n = 63) and parents (n = 196) in Head Start about sleep-related knowledge, attitudes/beliefs, sleep hygiene, and sleep problems. Head Start is the largest ECE program in the United States. Results: Most parents believed that their child had healthy sleep habits (81{\%}); few believed that he or she had a sleep problem (10{\%}). Yet, unhealthy bedtime practices and insufficient sleep for age were reported in 50{\%} and 33{\%} of children, respectively. Between 10{\%} and 12{\%} of children had 1 or more sleep onset or awakening problems. Every unhealthy bedtime practice but one was associated with a sleep problem; parental presence at bedtime was associated with the most problems. Insufficient sleep was significantly associated with unhealthy sleep practices. More children with late vs early bedtimes (48{\%} vs14{\%}, P",
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AB - Context: Healthy child development requires sufficient, quality sleep. Sleep problems in early childhood impair social-emotional and cognitive function and increase obesity risk. From a health literacy framework, "sleep health literacy" denotes the knowledge, motivation, and competencies to promote healthy sleep and to recognize a sleep problem. Design: To explore the untapped potential of early childhood education (ECE) programs to promote sleep health literacy, we surveyed staff (n = 63) and parents (n = 196) in Head Start about sleep-related knowledge, attitudes/beliefs, sleep hygiene, and sleep problems. Head Start is the largest ECE program in the United States. Results: Most parents believed that their child had healthy sleep habits (81%); few believed that he or she had a sleep problem (10%). Yet, unhealthy bedtime practices and insufficient sleep for age were reported in 50% and 33% of children, respectively. Between 10% and 12% of children had 1 or more sleep onset or awakening problems. Every unhealthy bedtime practice but one was associated with a sleep problem; parental presence at bedtime was associated with the most problems. Insufficient sleep was significantly associated with unhealthy sleep practices. More children with late vs early bedtimes (48% vs14%, P

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