Sleep and the Housing and Neighborhood Environment of Urban Latino Adults Living in Low-Income Housing: The AHOME Study

Earle C. Chambers, Margaret S. Pichardo, Emily Rosenbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sleep is implicated in the risk of many chronic diseases; however, little is known about the living conditions that influence sleep. In this study of 371 low-income Latino residents, household crowding was associated with reduced odds of long sleep duration relative to average and short sleep duration. Neighborhood disorder and perceived building problems were associated with more sleep disturbances and poor sleep quality. Building problems were associated with prolonged sleep latency. There was a significant cumulative effect of adverse housing and neighborhood conditions on sleep outcomes. These results show that adverse conditions of both the housing and neighborhood environments are associated with poor sleep outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)169-184
Number of pages16
JournalBehavioral Sleep Medicine
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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Hispanic Americans
Sleep
Crowding
Social Conditions
Chronic Disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Sleep and the Housing and Neighborhood Environment of Urban Latino Adults Living in Low-Income Housing : The AHOME Study. / Chambers, Earle C.; Pichardo, Margaret S.; Rosenbaum, Emily.

In: Behavioral Sleep Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 2, 03.03.2016, p. 169-184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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