Sinusitis in human immunodeficiency virus infection: Typical and atypical organisms

L. M. Milgrim, J. S. Rubin, David L. Rosenstreich, C. B. Small

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will develop acute sinusitis. This may be a single episode, or may be the beginning of a long course of recurrent sinusitis, of which the etiology is not yet well understood. A retrospective study of cultures from antral washings was conducted to determine the organisms that were more commonly isolated in patients with HIV infection and sinusitis. Forty-seven organisms were isolated from the sinus cultures of 41 HIV-positive patients. The most common organisms isolated were Streptococcus pneumoniae (19%), Streptococcus viridans (19%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17%). Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an atypical cause of acute sinusitis in the general population but was found to be an important pathogen in our HIV-infected patients. Other atypical organisms were also isolated, including Listeria monocytogenes and Candida albicans. It is important to recognize that atypical organisms must be considered if an HIV-infected patient with sinusitis does not respond to initial antibiotic therapy. A discussion follows emphasizing the need for prompt diagnosis and treatment of sinusitis in HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)450-453
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Otolaryngology
Volume23
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1994

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Sinusitis
Virus Diseases
HIV
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Viridans Streptococci
Listeria monocytogenes
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Candida albicans
Retrospective Studies
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Therapeutics
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

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Sinusitis in human immunodeficiency virus infection : Typical and atypical organisms. / Milgrim, L. M.; Rubin, J. S.; Rosenstreich, David L.; Small, C. B.

In: Journal of Otolaryngology, Vol. 23, No. 6, 1994, p. 450-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Milgrim, L. M. ; Rubin, J. S. ; Rosenstreich, David L. ; Small, C. B. / Sinusitis in human immunodeficiency virus infection : Typical and atypical organisms. In: Journal of Otolaryngology. 1994 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 450-453.
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