Simulation of carboxymyoglobin photodissociation

M. Sassaroli, Denis L. Rousseau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computer-generated models of the structures of deoxymyoglobin and CO-bound myoglobin show that the CO molecule is not packed so tightly by the amino acid residues of the distal pocket to prevent its motion away from the iron atom upon photodissociation. A simulation of low temperature photodissociation by energy minimization techniques shows that the CO moves to a position ~4 Å away from the iron atom due to the van der Waals forces. The final position of the CO molecules requires far larger motion of the carbon atom than the oxygen atom and thereby suggests that the isotope dependence of the molecular tunneling is a consequence of the orientation of the photodissociated CO.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)16292-16294
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume261
Issue number35
StatePublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Photodissociation
Carbon Monoxide
Atoms
Iron
Van der Waals forces
Molecules
Myoglobin
Isotopes
Computer Simulation
Carbon
carboxymyoglobin
Oxygen
Amino Acids
Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Simulation of carboxymyoglobin photodissociation. / Sassaroli, M.; Rousseau, Denis L.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 261, No. 35, 1986, p. 16292-16294.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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