Silent hippocampal seizures and spikes identified by foramen ovale electrodes in Alzheimer's disease

Alice D. Lam, Gina Deck, Alica Goldman, Emad N. Eskandar, Jeffrey Noebels, Andrew J. Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We directly assessed mesial temporal activity using intracranial foramen ovale electrodes in two patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) without a history or EEG evidence of seizures. We detected clinically silent hippocampal seizures and epileptiform spikes during sleep, a period when these abnormalities were most likely to interfere with memory consolidation. The findings in these index cases support a model in which early development of occult hippocampal hyperexcitability may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)678-680
Number of pages3
JournalNature Medicine
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Foramen Ovale
Alzheimer Disease
Electrodes
Seizures
Electroencephalography
Consolidation
Sleep
History
Data storage equipment
Memory Consolidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Silent hippocampal seizures and spikes identified by foramen ovale electrodes in Alzheimer's disease. / Lam, Alice D.; Deck, Gina; Goldman, Alica; Eskandar, Emad N.; Noebels, Jeffrey; Cole, Andrew J.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 678-680.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lam, Alice D. ; Deck, Gina ; Goldman, Alica ; Eskandar, Emad N. ; Noebels, Jeffrey ; Cole, Andrew J. / Silent hippocampal seizures and spikes identified by foramen ovale electrodes in Alzheimer's disease. In: Nature Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 23, No. 6. pp. 678-680.
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