Sex-specific impact of severe obesity in the outcomes of hospitalized patients with COVID-19: a large retrospective study from the Bronx, New York

Arcelia Guerson-Gil, Leonidas Palaiodimos, Andrei Assa, Dimitris Karamanis, Damianos Kokkinidis, Natalia Chamorro-Pareja, Preeti Kishore, Jason M. Leider, Lawrence J. Brandt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that obesity is an independent risk factor for worse outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Our objectives were to investigate which classes of obesity are associated with higher in-hospital mortality and to assess the association between obesity and systemic inflammation. This was a retrospective study which included consecutive hospitalized patients with COVID-19 in a tertiary center. Three thousand five hundred thirty patients were included in this analysis (female sex: 1579, median age: 65 years). The median body mass index (BMI) was 28.8 kg/m2. In the overall cohort, a J-shaped association between BMI and in-hospital mortality was depicted. In the subgroup of men, BMI 35–39.9 kg/m2 and BMI ≥40 kg/m2 were found to have significant association with higher in-hospital mortality, while only BMI ≥40 kg/m2 was found significant in the subgroup of women. No significant association between BMI and IL-6 was noted. Obesity classes II and III in men and obesity class III in women were independently associated with higher in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. The male population with severe obesity was the one that mainly drove this association. No significant association between BMI and IL-6 was noted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1963-1974
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Volume40
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • IL-6
  • Inflammation
  • Mortality
  • Novel coronavirus
  • Obesity
  • Observational study
  • Risk factor
  • SARS-CoV-2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sex-specific impact of severe obesity in the outcomes of hospitalized patients with COVID-19: a large retrospective study from the Bronx, New York'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this