Sex differences in the classification of children as mildly mentally retarded.

S. A. Richardson, H. Koller, Mindy Joy Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A consistent finding in epidemiological studies of mild mental retardation (MMR) is a somewhat higher prevalence of boys than girls. Our own study in Aberdeen agreed with these findings. Examination of the numbers of boys and girls at different levels of retardation within our study population revealed the greatest excess at the highest IQ levels of greater than or equal to 75. This was found to be true in other studies as well. Since this IQ range is above the generally agreed upon cut-off point used to classify children as MMR, these findings suggest that boys remaining in regular classes may be having more difficulty in school performance than girls. Possible reasons for this are examined.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)83-88
Number of pages6
JournalUpsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Supplement
Volume44
StatePublished - 1987

Fingerprint

Mentally Disabled Persons
Sex Characteristics
Intellectual Disability
Epidemiologic Studies
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sex differences in the classification of children as mildly mentally retarded. / Richardson, S. A.; Koller, H.; Katz, Mindy Joy.

In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Supplement, Vol. 44, 1987, p. 83-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{019bab6fce9a4568a536b10cb4c529b5,
title = "Sex differences in the classification of children as mildly mentally retarded.",
abstract = "A consistent finding in epidemiological studies of mild mental retardation (MMR) is a somewhat higher prevalence of boys than girls. Our own study in Aberdeen agreed with these findings. Examination of the numbers of boys and girls at different levels of retardation within our study population revealed the greatest excess at the highest IQ levels of greater than or equal to 75. This was found to be true in other studies as well. Since this IQ range is above the generally agreed upon cut-off point used to classify children as MMR, these findings suggest that boys remaining in regular classes may be having more difficulty in school performance than girls. Possible reasons for this are examined.",
author = "Richardson, {S. A.} and H. Koller and Katz, {Mindy Joy}",
year = "1987",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "83--88",
journal = "Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Supplement",
issn = "0300-9726",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex differences in the classification of children as mildly mentally retarded.

AU - Richardson, S. A.

AU - Koller, H.

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

PY - 1987

Y1 - 1987

N2 - A consistent finding in epidemiological studies of mild mental retardation (MMR) is a somewhat higher prevalence of boys than girls. Our own study in Aberdeen agreed with these findings. Examination of the numbers of boys and girls at different levels of retardation within our study population revealed the greatest excess at the highest IQ levels of greater than or equal to 75. This was found to be true in other studies as well. Since this IQ range is above the generally agreed upon cut-off point used to classify children as MMR, these findings suggest that boys remaining in regular classes may be having more difficulty in school performance than girls. Possible reasons for this are examined.

AB - A consistent finding in epidemiological studies of mild mental retardation (MMR) is a somewhat higher prevalence of boys than girls. Our own study in Aberdeen agreed with these findings. Examination of the numbers of boys and girls at different levels of retardation within our study population revealed the greatest excess at the highest IQ levels of greater than or equal to 75. This was found to be true in other studies as well. Since this IQ range is above the generally agreed upon cut-off point used to classify children as MMR, these findings suggest that boys remaining in regular classes may be having more difficulty in school performance than girls. Possible reasons for this are examined.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023622696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023622696&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 3328381

AN - SCOPUS:0023622696

VL - 44

SP - 83

EP - 88

JO - Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Supplement

JF - Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, Supplement

SN - 0300-9726

ER -