Serum prostate-specific antigen levels in older men with or at risk of HIV infection

L. E. Vianna, Yungtai Lo, Robert S. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the rate of, and factors associated with, elevated prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in older men with or at risk of HIV infection. Methods: Using a cross-sectional analysis, we interviewed 534 men ≥49 years old at risk for HIV infection on demographics, behaviours and medical history. Laboratory testing included serum PSA level and HIV serology, and T-cell subsets for those who were HIV seropositive. Elevated PSA level was defined as >4.0ng/mL, and men with elevated PSA levels were referred for urological evaluation. Results: Fifteen percent of men were white, 55% black, and 23% Hispanic; median age was 53 years (range 49-80 years); 74% were sexually active; 65% currently smoked cigarettes; and 16% had taken androgens. Among 310 HIV-positive men, CD4 counts were >500 cells/μL in 31%, 200-500cells/μL in 51%, and <200cells/μL in 19%. Twenty men (4%) had elevated PSA. On univariate analysis, only older age was significantly associated with elevated PSA, and there was no significant difference in the number of men with elevated PSA between HIV-positive and HIV-negative men (nine of 310 vs 11 of 224; P =0.28). On multivariate analysis, older age remained the only variable associated with elevated PSA level [reference group ≤50 years; adjusted odds ratio (ORadj) 1.0 for age 51-60 years; ORadj 5.9 (95% confidence interval 1.2-30.1) for age ≥61 years] adjusted for HIV status, family history of prostate cancer, and androgen use. Conclusions: Among older men, PSA levels increased with age but did not differ by HIV status. The clinical use of PSA levels in older men currently do not need to be modified for those with HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)471-476
Number of pages6
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume7
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

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Prostate-Specific Antigen
HIV Infections
HIV
Serum
Androgens
T-Lymphocyte Subsets
Serology
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Hispanic Americans
Tobacco Products
Prostatic Neoplasms
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Odds Ratio
Demography
Confidence Intervals

Keywords

  • Ageing
  • Men's health
  • Prostate
  • Prostate-specific antigen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology
  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology

Cite this

Serum prostate-specific antigen levels in older men with or at risk of HIV infection. / Vianna, L. E.; Lo, Yungtai; Klein, Robert S.

In: HIV Medicine, Vol. 7, No. 7, 10.2006, p. 471-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vianna, L. E. ; Lo, Yungtai ; Klein, Robert S. / Serum prostate-specific antigen levels in older men with or at risk of HIV infection. In: HIV Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 7. pp. 471-476.
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