Serotonin receptor sensitivity and aggression

Scott Wetzler, RenéS S. Kahn, Gregory M. Asnis, Martin Korn, Herman M. van Praag

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between increased serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5HT) receptor sensitivity and human aggression. A low oral dose of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), a postsynaptics 5HT receptor agonist, was administered in a placebo-controlled design to depressed (n = 22) and panic disorder (n = 20) patients classified with or wothout signs of outwardly directed aggression, patients with a history of suicide attemps (inwardly directed aggression) (n = 11), and normal controls (n = 19). Hormones under 5HT control were measured at 30-min intervals. Results were as follows: (1) MCPP did not induce or reduce anger, (2) patients with outwardly directed aggression did not have significantly greater MCPP-induced cortisol or prolactin release than did patients without signs of outwardly directed aggression, (3) patients with a history of suicide attemps did not have significantly greater MCPP-induced cortisol or prolactin release than did normal controls, and (4) MCPP-induced hormone release was unrelated to measures of aggression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-279
Number of pages9
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1991

Keywords

  • Meta-chlorophenylpiperazine
  • depression
  • panic disorder
  • suicidality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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