Screening for depression in urban Latino adolescents

John Rausch, Patricia A. Hametz, Rachel Zuckerbrot, William Rausch, Karen Soren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. Investigations were conducted on whether screening for adolescent depression was feasible and acceptable to patients in low-income, urban, predominantly Latino clinics. Further investigations were undertaken for provider acceptance of such screening. Methods. Adolescents aged between 13 and 20 years presenting to 3 pediatric and adolescent primary care practices affiliated with an academic medical center in New York City were screened for depressive symptoms using the Columbia Depression Scale. Providers were surveyed pre- and postimplementation of the screening regarding their attitudes and practices. Results. The vast majority (92%) of those approached accepted the screening. Twelve percent of those screened were referred for mental health treatment. Providers reported satisfaction with the screening tool and a desire to continue to use it. Screening was limited to 24% of eligible participants, and only 10% of screens were at sick visits. Conclusions. The Columbia Depression Scale seems acceptable to adolescent providers and patients in the mostly Latino study population. It may prove to be a helpful tool in evaluating adolescents presenting to primary care for depression. Further study will be required in other Spanish-speaking and minority populations. New methods will also be required to reach a greater proportion of patients, particularly those presenting for sick visits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)964-971
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume51
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Depression
Primary Health Care
Population
Mental Health
Pediatrics
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • adolescent
  • depression
  • screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Screening for depression in urban Latino adolescents. / Rausch, John; Hametz, Patricia A.; Zuckerbrot, Rachel; Rausch, William; Soren, Karen.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 51, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 964-971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rausch, J, Hametz, PA, Zuckerbrot, R, Rausch, W & Soren, K 2012, 'Screening for depression in urban Latino adolescents', Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 51, no. 10, pp. 964-971. https://doi.org/10.1177/0009922812441665
Rausch, John ; Hametz, Patricia A. ; Zuckerbrot, Rachel ; Rausch, William ; Soren, Karen. / Screening for depression in urban Latino adolescents. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 2012 ; Vol. 51, No. 10. pp. 964-971.
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