Screening for dementia by telephone using the Memory Impairment Screen

Richard B. Lipton, Mindy Joy Katz, Gail Kuslansky, Martin J. Sliwinski, Walter F. Stewart, Joe Verghese, Howard A. Crystal, Herman Buschke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

154 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To develop and assess telephone-based screening tests for dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). DESIGN: A cross-sectional validation study nested within a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. SETTING: The Einstein Aging Study of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred elderly community volunteers living in Bronx County, 27 of whom were diagnosed with dementia based on in-person clinical evaluation. Of the 27 individuals with dementia, 18 had AD. MEASUREMENTS: A telephone battery was administered that included the Memory Impairment Screen by telephone (MIS-T, a test of semantic memory), the Category Fluency Test (CF-T), and the Telephone Instrument for Cognitive Status (TICS). An in-person evaluation then followed that included a neurological examination, a neuropsychological battery, demographics, and medical history. RESULTS: The telephone battery was well accepted. The MIS-T required 4 minutes; the CF-T, 3 minutes; and the TICS, 10 minutes. The MIS-T had excellent sensitivity and specificity when compared with the CF-T and the TICS. Using cutscores on all three tests that provide a sensitivity of 78%, specificity was significantly higher for the MIS-T (93%) than for the CF-T (78%, P <.05) or the TICS (80%, P<.05). Combining the MIS-T and CF-T improved discriminative validity but increased screening time and the complexity of scoring. Normative data for the MIS-T, the CF-T, and the TICS for use in settings with different base rates (prevalence) of dementia are presented in this study. CONCLUSION: The MIS-T outperforms the CF-T and the TICS as a valid and time-efficient telephone screen for dementia. For applications that require optimal efficiency and accuracy, the MIS-T is recommended.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1382-1390
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Geriatrics Society
Volume51
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

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Telephone
Dementia
Alzheimer Disease
Sensitivity and Specificity
Validation Studies
Neurologic Examination
Semantics
Longitudinal Studies
Volunteers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Medicine
Demography
Efficiency

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia
  • Memory
  • Telephone screening

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Screening for dementia by telephone using the Memory Impairment Screen. / Lipton, Richard B.; Katz, Mindy Joy; Kuslansky, Gail; Sliwinski, Martin J.; Stewart, Walter F.; Verghese, Joe; Crystal, Howard A.; Buschke, Herman.

In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. 51, No. 10, 01.10.2003, p. 1382-1390.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lipton, Richard B. ; Katz, Mindy Joy ; Kuslansky, Gail ; Sliwinski, Martin J. ; Stewart, Walter F. ; Verghese, Joe ; Crystal, Howard A. ; Buschke, Herman. / Screening for dementia by telephone using the Memory Impairment Screen. In: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2003 ; Vol. 51, No. 10. pp. 1382-1390.
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AU - Lipton, Richard B.

AU - Katz, Mindy Joy

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AU - Stewart, Walter F.

AU - Verghese, Joe

AU - Crystal, Howard A.

AU - Buschke, Herman

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