Screening for Chlamydia and Gonorrhea: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

Karina W. Davidson, Michael J. Barry, Carol M. Mangione, Michael Cabana, Aaron B. Caughey, Esa M. Davis, Katrina E. Donahue, Chyke A. Doubeni, Alex H. Krist, Martha Kubik, Li Li, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Lori Pbert, Michael Silverstein, Melissa A. Simon, James Stevermer, Chien Wen Tseng, John B. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Importance: Chlamydia and gonorrhea are among the most common sexually transmitted infections in the US. Infection rates are highest among adolescents and young adults of both sexes. Chlamydial and gonococcal infections in women are usually asymptomatic and may lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and its associated complications. Newborns of pregnant persons with untreated infection may develop neonatal chlamydial pneumonia or gonococcal or chlamydial ophthalmia. Infection in men may lead to urethritis and epididymitis. Both types of infection can increase risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV. Objective: To update its 2014 recommendation, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) commissioned a systematic review to evaluate the benefits and harms of screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in sexually active adolescents and adults, including pregnant persons. Population: Asymptomatic, sexually active adolescents and adults, including pregnant persons. Evidence Assessment: The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for chlamydia in all sexually active women 24 years or younger and in women 25 years or older who are at increased risk for infection has moderate net benefit. The USPSTF concludes with moderate certainty that screening for gonorrhea in all sexually active women 24 years or younger and in women 25 years or older who are at increased risk for infection has moderate net benefit. The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in men. Recommendation: The USPSTF recommends screening for chlamydia in all sexually active women 24 years or younger and in women 25 years or older who are at increased risk for infection. (B recommendation) The USPSTF recommends screening for gonorrhea in all sexually active women 24 years or younger and in women 25 years or older who are at increased risk for infection. (B recommendation) The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for chlamydia and gonorrhea in men. (I statement).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)949-956
Number of pages8
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume326
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 14 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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