Scald burns from hair braiding

Jonathan P. Meizoso, Stephen R. Ramaley, Juliet J. Ray, Casey J. Allen, Gerardo A. Guarch, Robin Varas, Laura F. Teisch, Louis R. Pizano, Carl I. Schulman, Nicholas Namias

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Only one previous case report has described scald burns secondary to hair braiding in pediatric patients. The present case study is the largest to date of scald burns as a result of hair braiding in children and adults. Charts of all 1609 female patients seen at a single burn center from 2008 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed to identify patients with scald burns attributed to hair braiding. Demographics, injury severity, injury patterns, and complications were analyzed. Twenty-six patients (1.6%) had scald burns secondary to hair braiding with median TBSA 3%. Eighty-five percent of patients were pediatric with median age 8 years. Injury patterns were as follows: back (62%), shoulder (31%), chest (15%), buttocks (15%), abdomen (12%), arms (12%), neck (12%), and legs (4%). No patients required operative intervention. Three patients were admitted to the hospital. Two patients required time off from school for 6 and 10 days post burn for recovery. Complications included functional limitations (n = 2), hypertrophic scarring (n = 1), cellulitis requiring antibiotics (n = 1), and anxiety requiring medical/psychological therapy (n = 2). This peculiar mechanism of injury not only carries inherent morbidity that includes the risks of functional limitations, infection, and psychological repercussions but also increases usage of resources through hospital admissions and multiple clinic visits. Further work in the form of targeted outreach programs is necessary to educate the community regarding this preventable mechanism of injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e7-e9
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Research
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Hair
Burns
Wounds and Injuries
Pediatrics
Psychology
Burn Units
Buttocks
Cellulitis
Ambulatory Care
Abdomen
Cicatrix
Leg
Arm
Neck
Thorax
Anxiety
Demography
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Morbidity
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Meizoso, J. P., Ramaley, S. R., Ray, J. J., Allen, C. J., Guarch, G. A., Varas, R., ... Namias, N. (2016). Scald burns from hair braiding. Journal of Burn Care and Research, 37(1), e7-e9. https://doi.org/10.1097/BCR.0000000000000316

Scald burns from hair braiding. / Meizoso, Jonathan P.; Ramaley, Stephen R.; Ray, Juliet J.; Allen, Casey J.; Guarch, Gerardo A.; Varas, Robin; Teisch, Laura F.; Pizano, Louis R.; Schulman, Carl I.; Namias, Nicholas.

In: Journal of Burn Care and Research, Vol. 37, No. 1, 2016, p. e7-e9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Meizoso, JP, Ramaley, SR, Ray, JJ, Allen, CJ, Guarch, GA, Varas, R, Teisch, LF, Pizano, LR, Schulman, CI & Namias, N 2016, 'Scald burns from hair braiding', Journal of Burn Care and Research, vol. 37, no. 1, pp. e7-e9. https://doi.org/10.1097/BCR.0000000000000316
Meizoso, Jonathan P. ; Ramaley, Stephen R. ; Ray, Juliet J. ; Allen, Casey J. ; Guarch, Gerardo A. ; Varas, Robin ; Teisch, Laura F. ; Pizano, Louis R. ; Schulman, Carl I. ; Namias, Nicholas. / Scald burns from hair braiding. In: Journal of Burn Care and Research. 2016 ; Vol. 37, No. 1. pp. e7-e9.
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