Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma

Antonio C. Buzaid, Alan B. Sandier, Sridhar Mani, Anne McB Curtis, Wen Jen Poo, Jean L. Bolognia, Stephan Ariyan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

102 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the role of body computed tomography (CT) for the staging of patients with early melanoma. Patients and Methods: A total of 151 new patients with American Joint Committee (AJC) clinical stage I, II, and III melanoma who received a CT scan of at least the chest and abdomen are the subject of this study. CT scans considered suspicious for metastases were reviewed again by one of the investigators (A.McB.C.). Results: Of 151 patients, 63 had AJC clinical stage I, 61 stage II, and 23 stage III disease. In addition, one patient each had primary melanoma of the anal canal, esophagus, or vulva. Twenty-nine (19%) of 151 patients had a CT scan that was considered suspicious for metastases. The most common radiologic findings were single hepatic, and single or multiple pulmonary nodules. Of these 29 patients with suspicious scans, 24 subsequently proved to have benign processes by biopsy or follow-up studies, three had second primary tumors (well-differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and renal cell carcinoma), and only two were found to have metastatic melanoma. Of these two patients, one had regional nodal disease (unsuspected on physical examination) and one had distant nodal metastases. Conclusion: Body CT is not a useful imaging study in the detection of occult metastases in patients with primary melanoma. Although body CT commonly shows suspicious radiologic abnormalities in patients with early melanoma, these abnormalities most likely represent benign processes or a second primary tumor, rather than metastatic melanoma. The value of body CT in patients who present with nodal metastases needs further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)638-643
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume11
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1993
Externally publishedYes

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Melanoma
Tomography
Neoplasm Metastasis
Multiple Pulmonary Nodules
Vulva
Anal Canal
B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Hodgkin Disease
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Abdomen
Esophagus
Physical Examination
Neoplasms
Thorax
Research Personnel
Biopsy
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Buzaid, A. C., Sandier, A. B., Mani, S., Curtis, A. M., Poo, W. J., Bolognia, J. L., & Ariyan, S. (1993). Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 11(4), 638-643.

Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma. / Buzaid, Antonio C.; Sandier, Alan B.; Mani, Sridhar; Curtis, Anne McB; Poo, Wen Jen; Bolognia, Jean L.; Ariyan, Stephan.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 11, No. 4, 1993, p. 638-643.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buzaid, AC, Sandier, AB, Mani, S, Curtis, AM, Poo, WJ, Bolognia, JL & Ariyan, S 1993, 'Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 11, no. 4, pp. 638-643.
Buzaid AC, Sandier AB, Mani S, Curtis AM, Poo WJ, Bolognia JL et al. Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1993;11(4):638-643.
Buzaid, Antonio C. ; Sandier, Alan B. ; Mani, Sridhar ; Curtis, Anne McB ; Poo, Wen Jen ; Bolognia, Jean L. ; Ariyan, Stephan. / Role of computed tomography in the staging of primary melanoma. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1993 ; Vol. 11, No. 4. pp. 638-643.
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abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate the role of body computed tomography (CT) for the staging of patients with early melanoma. Patients and Methods: A total of 151 new patients with American Joint Committee (AJC) clinical stage I, II, and III melanoma who received a CT scan of at least the chest and abdomen are the subject of this study. CT scans considered suspicious for metastases were reviewed again by one of the investigators (A.McB.C.). Results: Of 151 patients, 63 had AJC clinical stage I, 61 stage II, and 23 stage III disease. In addition, one patient each had primary melanoma of the anal canal, esophagus, or vulva. Twenty-nine (19{\%}) of 151 patients had a CT scan that was considered suspicious for metastases. The most common radiologic findings were single hepatic, and single or multiple pulmonary nodules. Of these 29 patients with suspicious scans, 24 subsequently proved to have benign processes by biopsy or follow-up studies, three had second primary tumors (well-differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and renal cell carcinoma), and only two were found to have metastatic melanoma. Of these two patients, one had regional nodal disease (unsuspected on physical examination) and one had distant nodal metastases. Conclusion: Body CT is not a useful imaging study in the detection of occult metastases in patients with primary melanoma. Although body CT commonly shows suspicious radiologic abnormalities in patients with early melanoma, these abnormalities most likely represent benign processes or a second primary tumor, rather than metastatic melanoma. The value of body CT in patients who present with nodal metastases needs further study.",
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AU - Ariyan, Stephan

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N2 - Purpose: To evaluate the role of body computed tomography (CT) for the staging of patients with early melanoma. Patients and Methods: A total of 151 new patients with American Joint Committee (AJC) clinical stage I, II, and III melanoma who received a CT scan of at least the chest and abdomen are the subject of this study. CT scans considered suspicious for metastases were reviewed again by one of the investigators (A.McB.C.). Results: Of 151 patients, 63 had AJC clinical stage I, 61 stage II, and 23 stage III disease. In addition, one patient each had primary melanoma of the anal canal, esophagus, or vulva. Twenty-nine (19%) of 151 patients had a CT scan that was considered suspicious for metastases. The most common radiologic findings were single hepatic, and single or multiple pulmonary nodules. Of these 29 patients with suspicious scans, 24 subsequently proved to have benign processes by biopsy or follow-up studies, three had second primary tumors (well-differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, and renal cell carcinoma), and only two were found to have metastatic melanoma. Of these two patients, one had regional nodal disease (unsuspected on physical examination) and one had distant nodal metastases. Conclusion: Body CT is not a useful imaging study in the detection of occult metastases in patients with primary melanoma. Although body CT commonly shows suspicious radiologic abnormalities in patients with early melanoma, these abnormalities most likely represent benign processes or a second primary tumor, rather than metastatic melanoma. The value of body CT in patients who present with nodal metastases needs further study.

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