Risk of seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood

a prospective study

Shlomo Shinnar, A. T. Berg, Solomon L. Moshe, M. Petix, J. Maytal, H. Kang, E. S. Goldensohn, W. A. Hauser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a prospective study, 283 children who presented with a first unprovoked seizure were followed for a mean of 30 months from the time of first seizure. Subsequent seizures were experienced by 101 children (36%). The cumulative risk of seizure recurrence for the entire study group was 26% at 12 months, 36% at 24 months, 40% at 36 months, and 42% at 48 months. The cumulative risk of recurrence in the 47 children with a remote symptomatic first seizure was 37%, 53%, and 60% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively, compared with a cumulative risk of 24%, 33%, and 36% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively, in the 236 children who had had an idiopathic first seizure (P < .01). In children with an idiopathic first seizure, the electroencephalogram was the most important predictor of recurrence. The cumulative risk of recurrence in the 81 children with abnormal electroencephalograms was 41%, 54%, and 56% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively, but only 15%, 23%, and 26% at 12, 24, and 36 months, respectively, in the 138 children with normal electroencephalograms (P < .001). A history of epilepsy in a first-degree relative was a significant risk factor only in idiopathic cases with abnormal electroencephalograms. In children with a remote symptomatic first seizure, either a history of prior febrile seizures or the occurrence of a partial seizure were significant predictors of recurrence. Age at first seizure and duration of seizure did not affect recurrence risk in either the idiopathic or remote symptomatic group. A total of 84% of the children were not treated with antiepileptic drugs or were treated for less than 2 weeks. Only 9% were treated for longer than 3 months. Treatment did not affect the risk of recurrence. The results suggest that, even without treatment, the majority of children with a first unprovoked seizure will not experience a recurrence. Children with an idiopathic first seizure and a normal electroencephalogram have a particularly favorable prognosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1076-1085
Number of pages10
JournalPediatrics
Volume85
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1990

Fingerprint

Seizures
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Electroencephalography
Febrile Seizures
Anticonvulsants
Epilepsy

Keywords

  • electroencephalogram
  • seizure
  • status epilepticus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Shinnar, S., Berg, A. T., Moshe, S. L., Petix, M., Maytal, J., Kang, H., ... Hauser, W. A. (1990). Risk of seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: a prospective study. Pediatrics, 85(6), 1076-1085.

Risk of seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood : a prospective study. / Shinnar, Shlomo; Berg, A. T.; Moshe, Solomon L.; Petix, M.; Maytal, J.; Kang, H.; Goldensohn, E. S.; Hauser, W. A.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 85, No. 6, 1990, p. 1076-1085.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shinnar, S, Berg, AT, Moshe, SL, Petix, M, Maytal, J, Kang, H, Goldensohn, ES & Hauser, WA 1990, 'Risk of seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: a prospective study', Pediatrics, vol. 85, no. 6, pp. 1076-1085.
Shinnar, Shlomo ; Berg, A. T. ; Moshe, Solomon L. ; Petix, M. ; Maytal, J. ; Kang, H. ; Goldensohn, E. S. ; Hauser, W. A. / Risk of seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood : a prospective study. In: Pediatrics. 1990 ; Vol. 85, No. 6. pp. 1076-1085.
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