Risk factors predicting the postoperative outcome in 134 patients with active endocarditis

Siyamek Neragi-Miandoab, Edvard Skripochnik, Robert Michler, David D'Alessandro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Surgery remains the cornerstone in management of endocarditis. Methods: In this retrospective cohort we evaluated the operative outcome of patients with infective endocarditis. The SPSS program was used to analyze the data. Results: A total of 134 predominantly male patients (60%) with a mean age of 55 ± 12.4 years were examined. The procedures included single valve (n = 88; 66%), double/multiple valves (n = 29; 22%), and valve-coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) (n = 16; 12%). Perioperative mortality was 11.9% (n = 16). In the multivariate analysis, dialysis (odds ratio [OR] = 7.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.78-34.77]; P = .006), sepsis (OR = 19.5; 95% CI [2.76-137.9]; P = .002), and perfusion time (95% CI [1.00-1.02]; P = .003) were independent predictors of perioperative mortality. The overall long-term survival at 28 months was 69.2% ± 4%. Dialysis (P = .0001) was a predictor of mortality, whereas elevated creatinine in nondialysis patients (P = .0002) was not. In the multivariate analysis, dialysis (hazard ratio [HR] 4.06%; 95% CI [0.936- 8.526]; P = .0002), CABG (HR 2.32; 95% CI [1.086-4.978]; P = .0299), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (HR 2.20; 95% CI [1.027-4.739]; P = .0426), and double/multiple valve procedure (HR 3.0; 95% CI [1.467-6.206]; P = .0027) were risk factors for long-term mortality. Conclusion: Renal failure but not renal insufficiency is a risk factor for short and long-term mortality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E35-E41
JournalHeart Surgery Forum
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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