Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infection in the Undeserved Population after Ventral Hernia Repair: A 3936 Patient Single-Center Study Using National Surgical Quality Improvement Project

Gustavo Romero-Velez, Diego L. Lima, Xavier Pereira, Benjamin A. Farber, Patricia Friedmann, Flavio Malcher, Prashanth Sreeramoju

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Ventral hernia repair (VHR) is one of the most common surgical procedures performed in the United States. Surgical site infections (SSI) carry significant morbidity for the patient and pose a very challenging problem for the surgeon, associated with up to 6.6% of cases. Thus, surgeons should be well versed in the risk factors implicated in SSI after VHR. Given the high burden of diabetes, obesity, and smoking in our patient population, we sought to study the rate of SSI and the risk factors that led to SSI in our population. Study Design: This is a retrospective study using the American College of Surgeons-National Surgical Quality Improvement Project (ACS-NSQIP) database for the years 2014-2019. We identified patients who underwent VHR at a single institution in the Bronx, New York. The rate of SSI was calculated, and then, risk factors for SSI were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: A total of 3936 patients underwent VHR. Incisional hernias made up 41% of the cohort, and there were 37.4% laparoscopic repairs. During the 30-day follow-up, SSI was identified in 101 patients (2.6%). Factors associated with SSI include emergent surgery (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.57), body mass index >35 kg/m2 (aOR = 2.38), insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (aOR = 2.36), and incisional hernia (aOR = 1.81). In addition, a laparoscopic approach was found to be a protective factor (aOR = 0.43, 95% confidence interval 0.25-0.75). Surprisingly, different from other studies, smoking cigarettes was not associated with SSI in our cohort. Conclusions: The rate of SSI after VHR in our institution is 2.6%, which is within that reported in the literature. Most of the variables associated with SSI are modifiable and are similar to those previously reported. Laparoscopic repairs appear to be protective for its occurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)948-954
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Laparoendoscopic and Advanced Surgical Techniques
Volume32
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • hernia
  • NSQIP
  • postoperative complication
  • surgical site infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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