Risk factors and algorithms to identify hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and HIV among Georgian tuberculosis patients

Mark H. Kuniholm, Jennifer Mark, Malvina Aladashvili, N. Shubladze, G. Khechinashvili, Tengiz Tsertsvadze, Carlos del Rio, Kenrad E. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: To determine prevalence, risk factors, and simple identification algorithms for HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C co-infection; factors that may predispose for anti-tuberculosis therapy-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: We recruited 300 individuals at in-patient tuberculosis hospitals in three cities in Georgia, administered a behavioral questionnaire, and tested for antibody to HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc), and the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Results: Of the individuals tested, 0.7% were HIV positive, 4.3% were HBsAg positive, 8.7% were anti-HBc positive, and 12.0% were HCV positive. In multivariable analysis, a history of blood transfusion, injection drug use, and prison were significant independent risk factors for HCV, while a history of blood transfusion, injection drug use, younger age at sexual debut, and a high number of sex partners were significant risk factors for HBV. Three-questionnaire item algorithms predicted HCV serostatus 74.1% of the time and HBV serostatus 85.2% of the time. Conclusions: Treatment of tuberculosis patients in resource-limited countries with concurrent epidemics of HCV, HBV, and HIV may be associated with significant hepatotoxicity. Serologic screening of tuberculosis patients for HBV, HCV, and HIV or using behavioral algorithms to identify patients in need of intensive monitoring during anti-tuberculosis therapy may reduce this risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-56
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Georgia
  • HIV
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis C
  • Hepatotoxicity
  • Tuberculosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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    Kuniholm, M. H., Mark, J., Aladashvili, M., Shubladze, N., Khechinashvili, G., Tsertsvadze, T., del Rio, C., & Nelson, K. E. (2008). Risk factors and algorithms to identify hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and HIV among Georgian tuberculosis patients. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 12(1), 51-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2007.04.015