Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy

Nathan M. Bass, Kevin D. Mullen, Arun Sanyal, Fred Poordad, Guy Neff, Carroll B. Leevy, Samuel H. Sigal, Muhammad Y. Sheikh, Kimberly Beavers, Todd Frederick, Lewis Teperman, Donald Hillebrand, Shirley Huang, Kunal Merchant, Audrey Shaw, Enoch Bortey, William P. Forbes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

648 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Hepatic encephalopathy is a chronically debilitating complication of hepatic cirrhosis. The efficacy of rifaximin, a minimally absorbed antibiotic, is well documented in the treatment of acute hepatic encephalopathy, but its efficacy for prevention of the disease has not been established. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned 299 patients who were in remission from recurrent hepatic encephalopathy resulting from chronic liver disease to receive either rifaximin, at a dose of 550 mg twice daily (140 patients), or placebo (159 patients) for 6 months. The primary efficacy end point was the time to the first breakthrough episode of hepatic encephalopathy. The key secondary end point was the time to the first hospitalization involving hepatic encephalopathy. RESULTS: Rifaximin significantly reduced the risk of an episode of hepatic encephalopathy, as compared with placebo, over a 6-month period (hazard ratio with rifaximin, 0.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28 to 0.64; P<0.001). A breakthrough episode of hepatic encephalopathy occurred in 22.1% of patients in the rifaximin group, as compared with 45.9% of patients in the placebo group. A total of 13.6% of the patients in the rifaximin group had a hospitalization involving hepatic encephalopathy, as compared with 22.6% of patients in the placebo group, for a hazard ratio of 0.50 (95% CI, 0.29 to 0.87; P = 0.01). More than 90% of patients received concomitant lactulose therapy. The incidence of adverse events reported during the study was similar in the two groups, as was the incidence of serious adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: Over a 6-month period, treatment with rifaximin maintained remission from hepatic encephalopathy more effectively than did placebo. Rifaximin treatment also significantly reduced the risk of hospitalization involving hepatic encephalopathy. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00298038.)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1071-1081
Number of pages11
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume362
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 25 2010
Externally publishedYes

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rifaximin
Hepatic Encephalopathy
Placebos
Therapeutics
Hospitalization
Confidence Intervals
Lactulose
Incidence
Liver Cirrhosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Bass, N. M., Mullen, K. D., Sanyal, A., Poordad, F., Neff, G., Leevy, C. B., ... Forbes, W. P. (2010). Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy. New England Journal of Medicine, 362(12), 1071-1081. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0907893

Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy. / Bass, Nathan M.; Mullen, Kevin D.; Sanyal, Arun; Poordad, Fred; Neff, Guy; Leevy, Carroll B.; Sigal, Samuel H.; Sheikh, Muhammad Y.; Beavers, Kimberly; Frederick, Todd; Teperman, Lewis; Hillebrand, Donald; Huang, Shirley; Merchant, Kunal; Shaw, Audrey; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William P.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 362, No. 12, 25.03.2010, p. 1071-1081.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bass, NM, Mullen, KD, Sanyal, A, Poordad, F, Neff, G, Leevy, CB, Sigal, SH, Sheikh, MY, Beavers, K, Frederick, T, Teperman, L, Hillebrand, D, Huang, S, Merchant, K, Shaw, A, Bortey, E & Forbes, WP 2010, 'Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy', New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 362, no. 12, pp. 1071-1081. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0907893
Bass NM, Mullen KD, Sanyal A, Poordad F, Neff G, Leevy CB et al. Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy. New England Journal of Medicine. 2010 Mar 25;362(12):1071-1081. https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMoa0907893
Bass, Nathan M. ; Mullen, Kevin D. ; Sanyal, Arun ; Poordad, Fred ; Neff, Guy ; Leevy, Carroll B. ; Sigal, Samuel H. ; Sheikh, Muhammad Y. ; Beavers, Kimberly ; Frederick, Todd ; Teperman, Lewis ; Hillebrand, Donald ; Huang, Shirley ; Merchant, Kunal ; Shaw, Audrey ; Bortey, Enoch ; Forbes, William P. / Rifaximin treatment in hepatic encephalopathy. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 362, No. 12. pp. 1071-1081.
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AU - Leevy, Carroll B.

AU - Sigal, Samuel H.

AU - Sheikh, Muhammad Y.

AU - Beavers, Kimberly

AU - Frederick, Todd

AU - Teperman, Lewis

AU - Hillebrand, Donald

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