Review of COVID-19, part 1: Abdominal manifestations in adults and multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children

Devaraju Kanmaniraja, Jessica Kurian, Justin Holder, Molly Somberg Gunther, Victoria Chernyak, Kevin Hsu, Jimmy Lee, Andrew Mcclelland, Shira E. Slasky, Jenna Le, Zina J. Ricci

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID -19) pandemic caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has affected almost every country in the world, resulting in severe morbidity, mortality and economic hardship, and altering the landscape of healthcare forever. Although primarily a pulmonary illness, it can affect multiple organ systems throughout the body, sometimes with devastating complications and long-term sequelae. As we move into the second year of this pandemic, a better understanding of the pathophysiology of the virus and the varied imaging findings of COVID-19 in the involved organs is crucial to better manage this complex multi-organ disease and to help improve overall survival. This manuscript provides a comprehensive overview of the pathophysiology of the virus along with a detailed and systematic imaging review of the extra-thoracic manifestation of COVID-19 with the exception of unique cardiothoracic features associated with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). In Part I, extra-thoracic manifestations of COVID-19 in the abdomen in adults and features of MIS-C will be reviewed. In Part II, manifestations of COVID-19 in the musculoskeletal, central nervous and vascular systems will be reviewed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-110
Number of pages23
JournalClinical Imaging
Volume80
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Abdominal imaging
  • COVID-19
  • Multisystem inflammatory syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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