Rethinking the use of auditory brainstem response in acoustic neuroma screening

John J. Zappia, Cathleen A. O'Connor, Richard J. Wiet, Elizabeth A. Dinces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect very small acoustic tumors has triggered many to rethink the use of auditory brain-stem response (ABR) in the screening of acoustic tumors. To assess ABR accuracy, we conducted a retrospective study of 388 surgically treated patients. Of these patients, 111 had complete data-bases including both preoperative MRIs and ABRs. The ABR was abnormal by wave V interaural latency difference in 106 (95%) of the cases. Although our overall sensitivity was 95%, sensitivity varied according to tumor size. ABR was abnormal or absent for all tumors (100%) larger than 2 cm in diameter, for 98% of tumors 1.1 to 2 cm in diameter, and for only 89% of tumors less than or equal to 1 cm in diameter. Ramifications of this in the decision-making process are presented. Criteria for cut-off values are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1388-1392
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume107
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Acoustic Neuroma
Brain Stem Auditory Evoked Potentials
Neoplasms
Aptitude
Decision Making
Retrospective Studies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Databases

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Rethinking the use of auditory brainstem response in acoustic neuroma screening. / Zappia, John J.; O'Connor, Cathleen A.; Wiet, Richard J.; Dinces, Elizabeth A.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 107, No. 10, 10.1997, p. 1388-1392.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zappia, John J. ; O'Connor, Cathleen A. ; Wiet, Richard J. ; Dinces, Elizabeth A. / Rethinking the use of auditory brainstem response in acoustic neuroma screening. In: Laryngoscope. 1997 ; Vol. 107, No. 10. pp. 1388-1392.
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