Resident and "inflammatory" dendritic cells in human skin

Lisa C. Zaba, James G. Krueger, Michelle A. Lowes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

210 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) are a heterogeneous group of antigen-presenting leukocytes that are important in activation of both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Although there are several different DC populations in the body, DCs are globally defined by their capacity for potent antigen presentation and naive T-cell activation. In noninflamed human skin during steady state, there are three main cutaneous DC populations: epidermal Langerhans cells, dermal myeloid DCs, and dermal plasmacytoid DCs. In psoriasis, a model for cutaneous inflammation, there is an additional population of myeloid dermal DCs - "inflammatory DCs" - which appears to be critical for disease pathogenesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)302-308
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Investigative Dermatology
Volume129
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Langerhans Cells
Dendritic Cells
Skin
Population
Antigen Presentation
Myeloid Cells
HLA Antigens
Psoriasis
Chemical activation
Immune System
Antigens
T-cells
Immune system
Inflammation
T-Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Resident and "inflammatory" dendritic cells in human skin. / Zaba, Lisa C.; Krueger, James G.; Lowes, Michelle A.

In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 129, No. 2, 02.2009, p. 302-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zaba, Lisa C. ; Krueger, James G. ; Lowes, Michelle A. / Resident and "inflammatory" dendritic cells in human skin. In: Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 2009 ; Vol. 129, No. 2. pp. 302-308.
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