Research priorities to achieve universal access to hepatitis C prevention, management and direct-acting antiviral treatment among people who inject drugs

Jason Grebely, Julie Bruneau, Jeffrey V. Lazarus, Olav Dalgard, Philip Bruggmann, Carla Treloar, Matthew Hickman, Margaret Hellard, Teri Roberts, Levinia Crooks, Håvard Midgard, Sarah Larney, Louisa Degenhardt, Hannu Alho, Jude Byrne, John F. Dillon, Jordan J. Feld, Graham Foster, David Goldberg, Andrew R. LloydJens Reimer, Geert Robaeys, Marta Torrens, Nat Wright, Icro Maremmani, Brianna L. Norton, Alain H. Litwin, Gregory J. Dore

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Globally, it is estimated that 71.1 million people have chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, including an estimated 7.5 million people who have recently injected drugs (PWID). There is an additional large, but unquantified, burden among those PWID who have ceased injecting. The incidence of HCV infection among current PWID also remains high in many settings. Morbidity and mortality due to liver disease among PWID with HCV infection continues to increase, despite the advent of well-tolerated, simple interferon-free direct-acting antiviral (DAA) HCV regimens with cure rates >95%. As a result of this important clinical breakthrough, there is potential to reverse the rising burden of advanced liver disease with increased treatment and strive for HCV elimination among PWID. Unfortunately, there are many gaps in knowledge that represent barriers to effective prevention and management of HCV among PWID. The Kirby Institute, UNSW Sydney and the International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU) established an expert round table panel to assess current research gaps and establish future research priorities for the prevention and management of HCV among PWID. This round table consisted of a one-day workshop held on 6 September, 2016, in Oslo, Norway, prior to the International Symposium on Hepatitis in Substance Users (INHSU 2016). International experts in drug and alcohol, infectious diseases, and hepatology were brought together to discuss the available scientific evidence, gaps in research, and develop research priorities. Topics for discussion included the epidemiology of injecting drug use, HCV, and HIV among PWID, HCV prevention, HCV testing, linkage to HCV care and treatment, DAA treatment for HCV infection, and reinfection following successful treatment. This paper highlights the outcomes of the roundtable discussion focused on future research priorities for enhancing HCV prevention, testing, linkage to care and DAA treatment for PWID as we strive for global elimination of HCV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)51-60
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume47
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Hepatitis C
Hepacivirus
Antiviral Agents
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Virus Diseases
Hepatitis
Liver Diseases
Chronic Hepatitis C
Gastroenterology
Norway
Interferons
Communicable Diseases
Epidemiology
Alcohols

Keywords

  • DAA
  • Drug users
  • HCV
  • IFN-free
  • Injecting
  • PWID

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy

Cite this

Research priorities to achieve universal access to hepatitis C prevention, management and direct-acting antiviral treatment among people who inject drugs. / Grebely, Jason; Bruneau, Julie; Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Dalgard, Olav; Bruggmann, Philip; Treloar, Carla; Hickman, Matthew; Hellard, Margaret; Roberts, Teri; Crooks, Levinia; Midgard, Håvard; Larney, Sarah; Degenhardt, Louisa; Alho, Hannu; Byrne, Jude; Dillon, John F.; Feld, Jordan J.; Foster, Graham; Goldberg, David; Lloyd, Andrew R.; Reimer, Jens; Robaeys, Geert; Torrens, Marta; Wright, Nat; Maremmani, Icro; Norton, Brianna L.; Litwin, Alain H.; Dore, Gregory J.

In: International Journal of Drug Policy, Vol. 47, 01.09.2017, p. 51-60.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Grebely, J, Bruneau, J, Lazarus, JV, Dalgard, O, Bruggmann, P, Treloar, C, Hickman, M, Hellard, M, Roberts, T, Crooks, L, Midgard, H, Larney, S, Degenhardt, L, Alho, H, Byrne, J, Dillon, JF, Feld, JJ, Foster, G, Goldberg, D, Lloyd, AR, Reimer, J, Robaeys, G, Torrens, M, Wright, N, Maremmani, I, Norton, BL, Litwin, AH & Dore, GJ 2017, 'Research priorities to achieve universal access to hepatitis C prevention, management and direct-acting antiviral treatment among people who inject drugs', International Journal of Drug Policy, vol. 47, pp. 51-60. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugpo.2017.05.019
Grebely, Jason ; Bruneau, Julie ; Lazarus, Jeffrey V. ; Dalgard, Olav ; Bruggmann, Philip ; Treloar, Carla ; Hickman, Matthew ; Hellard, Margaret ; Roberts, Teri ; Crooks, Levinia ; Midgard, Håvard ; Larney, Sarah ; Degenhardt, Louisa ; Alho, Hannu ; Byrne, Jude ; Dillon, John F. ; Feld, Jordan J. ; Foster, Graham ; Goldberg, David ; Lloyd, Andrew R. ; Reimer, Jens ; Robaeys, Geert ; Torrens, Marta ; Wright, Nat ; Maremmani, Icro ; Norton, Brianna L. ; Litwin, Alain H. ; Dore, Gregory J. / Research priorities to achieve universal access to hepatitis C prevention, management and direct-acting antiviral treatment among people who inject drugs. In: International Journal of Drug Policy. 2017 ; Vol. 47. pp. 51-60.
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AU - Hellard, Margaret

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AU - Degenhardt, Louisa

AU - Alho, Hannu

AU - Byrne, Jude

AU - Dillon, John F.

AU - Feld, Jordan J.

AU - Foster, Graham

AU - Goldberg, David

AU - Lloyd, Andrew R.

AU - Reimer, Jens

AU - Robaeys, Geert

AU - Torrens, Marta

AU - Wright, Nat

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