Renshaw cells are inactive during motor inhibition elicited by the pontine microinjection of carbachol

Francisco R. Morales, J. Kerch Engelhardt, Alberto E. Pereda, Jack Yamuy, Michael H. Chase

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study was undertaken to determine whether the postsynaptic inhibition of motoneurons that occurs following the pontine microinjection of carbachol in the decerebrate cat is due to the activity of Renshaw cells. Thirty-two out of 37 Renshaw cells (86%) were spontaneously active prior to the administration of carbachol, whereas only 2 out of 13 Renshaw cells (15%) discharged during carbachol-induced motor inhibition. In addition, discrete inhibitory synaptic potentials were observed in 33% of the Renshaw cells from which intracellular recordings were obtained after carbachol administration, indicating that these cells were actively inhibited. The finding that a population of Renshaw cells, which inhibit motoneurons, were themselves inhibited during a period of profound motoneuron inhibition was quite unexpected. These results support the conclusion that Renshaw cells are not the inhibitory interneurons that are responsible for the powerful inhibition of motoneurons that occurs following the pontine microinjection of carbachol.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-295
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 1988
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Carbachol
  • Hypotonia
  • Postsynaptic inhibition
  • Renshaw cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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