Relationships among clinic, home, and ambulatory blood pressures with small vessel disease of the brain and functional status in older people with hypertension

William B. White, Fatima Jalil, Dorothy B. Wakefield, Richard F. Kaplan, Richard W. Bohannon, Charles B. Hall, Nicola Moscufo, Douglas Fellows, Charles R.G. Guttmann, Leslie Wolfson

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Abstract

Background: Subcortical small vessel disease, represented as white matter hyperintensity (WMH) on magnetic resonance images (MRI) is associated with functional decline in older people with hypertension. We evaluated the relationships of clinic and out-of-office blood pressures (BP) with WMH and functional status in older persons. Methods: Using cross-sectional data from 199 older study participants enrolled in the INFINITY trial, we analyzed the clinic, 24-hour ambulatory, and home BPs and their relationships with WMH burden and mobility and cognitive outcomes. Results: Volume of WMH was associated with clinic and 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP but not home systolic BP. The mobility measure, supine-to-sit time, had a significant association with 24-hour systolic BP and pulse pressure but not with diastolic BP or values obtained by home BP. Cognitive measures of processing speed (Trails Making Test Part A and the Stroop Word Test) were significantly associated with 24-hour systolic BP, but not clinic and home BPs. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that ambulatory BP measurements in older people are more strongly associated with WMH and certain measures of functional status compared to home BP measurements. Hence, home BP may not be a useful substitute for ambulatory BP for assessing subcortical small vessel disease and its consequences. Further longitudinal analyses comparing clinic and various types of out-of-office BP measures with small vessel brain disease are needed. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01650402.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)21-30
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Heart Journal
Volume205
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

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Brain Diseases
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Trail Making Test
Stroop Test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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Relationships among clinic, home, and ambulatory blood pressures with small vessel disease of the brain and functional status in older people with hypertension. / White, William B.; Jalil, Fatima; Wakefield, Dorothy B.; Kaplan, Richard F.; Bohannon, Richard W.; Hall, Charles B.; Moscufo, Nicola; Fellows, Douglas; Guttmann, Charles R.G.; Wolfson, Leslie.

In: American Heart Journal, Vol. 205, 01.11.2018, p. 21-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

White, William B. ; Jalil, Fatima ; Wakefield, Dorothy B. ; Kaplan, Richard F. ; Bohannon, Richard W. ; Hall, Charles B. ; Moscufo, Nicola ; Fellows, Douglas ; Guttmann, Charles R.G. ; Wolfson, Leslie. / Relationships among clinic, home, and ambulatory blood pressures with small vessel disease of the brain and functional status in older people with hypertension. In: American Heart Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 205. pp. 21-30.
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AU - Kaplan, Richard F.

AU - Bohannon, Richard W.

AU - Hall, Charles B.

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