Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cell migration and invasion

Hideki Yamaguchi, John S. Condeelis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

603 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Malignant cancer cells utilize their intrinsic migratory ability to invade adjacent tissues and the vasculature, and ultimately to metastasize. Cell migration is the sum of multi-step processes initiated by the formation of membrane protrusions in response to migratory and chemotactic stimuli. The driving force for membrane protrusion is localized polymerization of submembrane actin filaments. Recently, several studies revealed that molecules that link migratory signals to the actin cytoskeleton are upregulated in invasive and metastatic cancer cells. In this review, we summarize recent progress on molecular mechanisms of formation of invasive protrusions used by tumor cells, such as lamellipodia and invadopodia, with regard to the functions of key regulatory proteins of the actin cytoskeleton; WASP family proteins, Arp2/3 complex, LIM-kinase, cofilin, and cortactin.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-652
Number of pages11
JournalBiochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research
Volume1773
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Actin Cytoskeleton
Cell Movement
Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein Family
Lim Kinases
Cortactin
Actin-Related Protein 2-3 Complex
Actin Depolymerizing Factors
Neoplasms
Pseudopodia
Membranes
Polymerization
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cell motility
  • Cofilin
  • Cortactin
  • Invadopodia
  • Lamellipodia
  • WASP family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Biophysics

Cite this

Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cell migration and invasion. / Yamaguchi, Hideki; Condeelis, John S.

In: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Molecular Cell Research, Vol. 1773, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 642-652.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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