Regulation of Class Switch Recombination

Michel Cogné, Barbara K. Birshtein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the regulation of class-switch recombination (CSR) to all non-m isotypes, except for delta. The expression of immunoglobulin D (IgD) results from alternative splicing that regularly occurs as part of B-cell maturation, and only rarely involves Cμ deletion. In contrast, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) recombination is constantly needed for the other isotypes, and there are a number of elements that are now known to be essential. For example, a critical first step in CSR is germline transcription (GT), whose production for several isotypes is dependent on at least two of the 3 immunoglobulin H (IgH) enhancers. GT of individual isotypes requires cell-cell interaction involving CD40 and CD40L, various B cell transcription factors, including NFkB and specific T cell cytokines. A predilection to switch to particular classes, especially immunoglobulin E (IgE) in allergic individuals can be harmful for human health, and most likely is fostered by the T cell cytokine profile associated with particular Th subsets. Mistakes in CSR have been associated with chromosomal translocations involving "c-myc" and are regularly detected in murine plasmacytomas, human myeloma, and Burkitt's lymphoma. Current challenges are to identify the signals that trigger 3 enhancer activity during B-cell development and the mechanisms that engage these enhancers with I promoters for GT. The formation of GT clearly involves both positive and negative regulation, providing an additional arena for critical investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMolecular Biology of B Cells
PublisherElsevier Inc.
Pages289-304
Number of pages16
ISBN (Print)9780080479507, 9780120536412
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2003

Fingerprint

Genetic Recombination
B-Lymphocytes
Cytokines
T-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin D
Genetic Translocation
CD40 Ligand
Plasmacytoma
Burkitt Lymphoma
Alternative Splicing
Cell Communication
Immunoglobulin E
Immunoglobulins
Transcription Factors
DNA
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Cogné, M., & Birshtein, B. K. (2003). Regulation of Class Switch Recombination. In Molecular Biology of B Cells (pp. 289-304). Elsevier Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012053641-2/50020-4

Regulation of Class Switch Recombination. / Cogné, Michel; Birshtein, Barbara K.

Molecular Biology of B Cells. Elsevier Inc., 2003. p. 289-304.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Cogné, M & Birshtein, BK 2003, Regulation of Class Switch Recombination. in Molecular Biology of B Cells. Elsevier Inc., pp. 289-304. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012053641-2/50020-4
Cogné M, Birshtein BK. Regulation of Class Switch Recombination. In Molecular Biology of B Cells. Elsevier Inc. 2003. p. 289-304 https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-012053641-2/50020-4
Cogné, Michel ; Birshtein, Barbara K. / Regulation of Class Switch Recombination. Molecular Biology of B Cells. Elsevier Inc., 2003. pp. 289-304
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