Reducing peripherally inserted central catheters and midline catheters by training nurses in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement

Benjamin Galen, Sarah Baron, Sandra Young, Alleyne Hall, Linda Berger-Spivack, William Southern

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Training nurses in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement might reduce the use of more invasive venous access devices (peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) and midline catheters). Methods: We implemented an abbreviated training in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement for nurses on an inpatient medical unit and provided a portable ultrasound device for 10 months. Results: Nurses on this unit placed 99 ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheters with a high level of success. During the implementation period, PICC and midline catheter placement decreased from a mean 4.8 to 2.5 per month, meeting criteria for special cause variation. In the postimplementation period, the average catheter use reverted to 4.3 per month on the intervention unit. A comparison inpatient medical unit without training or access to a portable ultrasound device experienced no significant change in PICC and midline catheter use throughout the study period (mean of 6.0 per month). Conclusions: These results suggest that an abbreviated training in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement for nurses on an inpatient medical unit is sufficient to reduce PICC and midline catheters.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBMJ Quality and Safety
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Catheters
Nurses
Inpatients
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Hospital medicine
  • Nurses
  • Patient safety
  • Quality improvement
  • Statistical process control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

Cite this

Reducing peripherally inserted central catheters and midline catheters by training nurses in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement. / Galen, Benjamin; Baron, Sarah; Young, Sandra; Hall, Alleyne; Berger-Spivack, Linda; Southern, William.

In: BMJ Quality and Safety, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Southern, William

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N2 - Background: Training nurses in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement might reduce the use of more invasive venous access devices (peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) and midline catheters). Methods: We implemented an abbreviated training in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement for nurses on an inpatient medical unit and provided a portable ultrasound device for 10 months. Results: Nurses on this unit placed 99 ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheters with a high level of success. During the implementation period, PICC and midline catheter placement decreased from a mean 4.8 to 2.5 per month, meeting criteria for special cause variation. In the postimplementation period, the average catheter use reverted to 4.3 per month on the intervention unit. A comparison inpatient medical unit without training or access to a portable ultrasound device experienced no significant change in PICC and midline catheter use throughout the study period (mean of 6.0 per month). Conclusions: These results suggest that an abbreviated training in ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement for nurses on an inpatient medical unit is sufficient to reduce PICC and midline catheters.

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