Recombinant beta-interferon in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

Sridhar Mani, Mary Todd, Wen Jen Poo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report on the clinical course of 15 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who were treated with recombinant beta-interferon as part of a phase I-II study. There were no objective responders among the 15 patients treated with recombinant beta-interferon at an i.v. dose escalating from 90 x 106 to 720 x 106 U given three times a week until there was documented disease progression or complete response (CR). Overall median survival was 24 months. One patient refused further treatment after 7 weeks. The major side effects of treatment included cardiovascular events (20%), mental status change requiring cessation of drug (6.7%), and grade 3 headaches/myalgias (26.7%). There were no life-threatening side effects observed; however, cardiac events led to the termination of treatment in three patients. Other minor toxicities included fatigue (46.7%), proteinuria (60%), diarrhea (6.7%), nausea and vomiting (13.3%), persistent fever (6.7%), and transient visual disturbance (6.7%). Thus, at our institution, in a cohort of 15 patients with metastatic RCC, recombinant beta-interferon when given i.v. at a dose ≤720 x 106 U three times per week, yielded no clinical antitumor activity. A review of the literature on the use of beta-interferon for metastatic RCC suggests that there may be some efficacy, but our experience with escalating i.v. doses ≤720 x 106 U given three times a week does not support it. Moreover, at these doses, one may find serious cardiovascular events although further studies need to be done in order to clearly define dose-related side effects as well as optimal efficacy-to-toxicity ratio.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-189
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interferon-beta
Renal Cell Carcinoma
Therapeutics
Myalgia
Proteinuria
Nausea
Vomiting
Fatigue
Headache
Disease Progression
Diarrhea
Fever
Survival
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Beta-interferon
  • Renal cell carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Recombinant beta-interferon in the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. / Mani, Sridhar; Todd, Mary; Poo, Wen Jen.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 19, No. 2, 04.1996, p. 187-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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