Recognition of pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine by human CD1d-restricted γδ T cells

Anna M. Russano, Elisabetta Agea, Lanfranco Corazzi, Antyony D. Postle, Gennaro De Libero, Steven A. Porcelli, Fernando M. de Benedictis, Fabrizio Spinozzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Evidences from mice and human beings indicate that γδ T cells could be relevant in recognition of stress-induced self and/or yet unidentified inhaled foreign antigens. Their specificity differs from classic MHC-restricted αβ T cells and involves the immunoglobulin-like structure of the γδ T-cell receptor with the recognition of small organic molecules, alkylamines, and self lipid compounds presented by CD1 + dendritic cells. Objective: Because CD1 receptors are mainly devoted to lipid antigen presentation, we sought to determine whether exogenous pollen membrane lipids may act as allergens for CD1-restricted γδ T cells. Methods: Peripheral blood and nasal mucosa-associated γδ T cells were cloned from normal controls and cypress-sensitive subjects and tested for their antigen specificity and CD1-restriction with phospholipids extracted from tree pollen grains, as well with other natural or synthetic compounds. Phospholipid reactivity of cloned γδ T cells was measured by mean of proliferative response and cytokine release as well as by testing their helper activity on IgE production in vitro and in vivo. Results: Cloned γδ T lymphocytes from subjects with allergy, but not normal controls, were found to recognize pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE) in a CD1d-restricted fashion. Only 16:0/18:2 and 18:2/18:2 PE were stimulatory, whereas no response was recorded for disaturated PE, phosphatidylcholine, neutral lipids, or protein extract. Proliferating clones secreted both T H1-type and T H2-type cytokines and drove IgE production in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: CD1d-restricted γδ T cells specific for phospholipids can represent a key mucosal regulatory subset for the control of early host reactivity against tree pollens. Clinical implications: By knowing how lipid allergen constituents interact with mucosal immune system, we can expand our possibilities in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1178-1184
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume117
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006

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Ethanolamine
Pollen
T-Lymphocytes
Lipids
Phospholipids
Allergens
Immunoglobulin E
CD1 Antigens
Cupressus
Cytokines
Nasal Mucosa
Antigen Presentation
Membrane Lipids
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Phosphatidylcholines
Dendritic Cells
Immunoglobulins
Immune System
Hypersensitivity
Clone Cells

Keywords

  • γδ T lymphocytes
  • CD1-restriction
  • Cypress pollen
  • cytokines
  • IL-4, skin prick tests
  • nasal mucosa
  • olive pollen
  • phosphatidyl-ethanolamine
  • phospholipids
  • rhinitis
  • specific IgE
  • T-cell clones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

Recognition of pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine by human CD1d-restricted γδ T cells. / Russano, Anna M.; Agea, Elisabetta; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Postle, Antyony D.; De Libero, Gennaro; Porcelli, Steven A.; de Benedictis, Fernando M.; Spinozzi, Fabrizio.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 117, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 1178-1184.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Russano, AM, Agea, E, Corazzi, L, Postle, AD, De Libero, G, Porcelli, SA, de Benedictis, FM & Spinozzi, F 2006, 'Recognition of pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine by human CD1d-restricted γδ T cells', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 117, no. 5, pp. 1178-1184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2006.01.001
Russano, Anna M. ; Agea, Elisabetta ; Corazzi, Lanfranco ; Postle, Antyony D. ; De Libero, Gennaro ; Porcelli, Steven A. ; de Benedictis, Fernando M. ; Spinozzi, Fabrizio. / Recognition of pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine by human CD1d-restricted γδ T cells. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2006 ; Vol. 117, No. 5. pp. 1178-1184.
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abstract = "Background: Evidences from mice and human beings indicate that γδ T cells could be relevant in recognition of stress-induced self and/or yet unidentified inhaled foreign antigens. Their specificity differs from classic MHC-restricted αβ T cells and involves the immunoglobulin-like structure of the γδ T-cell receptor with the recognition of small organic molecules, alkylamines, and self lipid compounds presented by CD1 + dendritic cells. Objective: Because CD1 receptors are mainly devoted to lipid antigen presentation, we sought to determine whether exogenous pollen membrane lipids may act as allergens for CD1-restricted γδ T cells. Methods: Peripheral blood and nasal mucosa-associated γδ T cells were cloned from normal controls and cypress-sensitive subjects and tested for their antigen specificity and CD1-restriction with phospholipids extracted from tree pollen grains, as well with other natural or synthetic compounds. Phospholipid reactivity of cloned γδ T cells was measured by mean of proliferative response and cytokine release as well as by testing their helper activity on IgE production in vitro and in vivo. Results: Cloned γδ T lymphocytes from subjects with allergy, but not normal controls, were found to recognize pollen-derived phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (PE) in a CD1d-restricted fashion. Only 16:0/18:2 and 18:2/18:2 PE were stimulatory, whereas no response was recorded for disaturated PE, phosphatidylcholine, neutral lipids, or protein extract. Proliferating clones secreted both T H1-type and T H2-type cytokines and drove IgE production in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: CD1d-restricted γδ T cells specific for phospholipids can represent a key mucosal regulatory subset for the control of early host reactivity against tree pollens. Clinical implications: By knowing how lipid allergen constituents interact with mucosal immune system, we can expand our possibilities in diagnostic and therapeutic interventions.",
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AU - De Libero, Gennaro

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