Rates, Risk Factors, and Complications of Red Blood Cell Transfusion in Metastatic Spinal Tumor Surgery: An Analysis of a Prospective Multicenter Surgical Database

Rafael De la Garza Ramos, Yaroslav Gelfand, Joshua A. Benton, Michael Longo, Murray Echt, Vijay Yanamadala, Reza Yassari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To identify rates, risks, and complications of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in metastatic spinal tumor surgery. Methods: The multicenter prospective American College of Surgeons National Quality Improvement Program database was queried for the years 2012–2016. Adult patients with disseminated cancer who underwent metastatic spinal tumor surgery were identified. Transfusion was defined as having received at least 1 intraoperative/postoperative RBC transfusion within the first 72 hours of surgery start time. A stepwise multiple logistic regression model with backward elimination was used. Results: Of 1601 patients identified, 623 patients (38.9%) received a RBC transfusion. Independent predictors of RBC transfusion included higher American Society of Anesthesiologists class (odds ratio [OR] = 1.54), preoperative anemia (OR = 3.10), instrumentation (OR = 1.63), and longer operative time (OR = 1.52). The overall complication rate was significantly higher in patients who received a transfusion compared with patients who did not receive a transfusion (22.3% vs. 15.0%, P < 0.001). Individual complications that were more common in patients who received a transfusion were sepsis (3.5% vs. 1.9%, P = 0.050), deep vein thrombosis (6.1% vs. 3.3%, P = 0.007), and prolonged ventilation (3.9% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.001). RBC transfusion (OR = 1.65), hypoalbuminemia (OR = 1.53), and anterior/anterolateral approaches for corpectomy (OR = 2.11) were independent risk factors for developing a postoperative complication. Conclusions: RBC transfusion after metastatic spinal tumor surgery may increase the risk of early postoperative complications. Future research into preoperative patient optimization and decreasing intraoperative blood loss is needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e308-e315
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume139
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Metastatic spine disease
  • Red blood cell
  • Spinal surgery
  • Spinal tumor
  • Transfusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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